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Imrallon Players Guide

The world of Imrallon is filled with magic and mystery. Culturally, it is based on ancient Greco-roman society with a little Arthurian mythos and traditional high fantasy mixed in. With that being said, there are restrictions on certain races and classes for 5e Dungeons and Dragons.

Rules of the Game General Rules Acceptable Material

Any official published material is acceptable as long as it falls within the scope of the world. The GM reserves the right to deem official content as not acceptable. 3rd party material is subject to GM review and approval. Below are specific changes to official content and some homebrewed content.

Character Backstories and Questionnaire

All players are required to provide a backstory that details the following informationHow the character was raised.

  • Class choice (How and why the character became the class)
  • Traits, Ideals, Bonds, Flaws (What happened to cause them to get these)
  • Any other details that you would like to provide. The character questionnaire is another tool to provide the GM with additional information for the character.

PLEASE NOTE: Details provided in both the backstory and questionnaire will be used against the character. Their Traits, Ideals, Bonds and Flaws will be tested. Character’s will be put in situations where difficult decisions will need to be made and deal with the repercussions of these decisions.

House Rules Hit Points

When leveling up past level two, hit points are rolled using the hit die for the class. If you roll a 1 on this roll, you may reroll until you have a number greater than 1.

Critical Hit/Fumble Tables

Campaigns set in this realm use a custom set of critical hit and fumble tables. Instead of the standard rules for critical hits, your character does the maximum amount of weapon damage, plus an additional effect that is determined on the table. Replacing the standard rules for critical fumbles, your character will still automatically miss, plus an additional effect that is determined on the table.

Healing Special Rules

In the world of Imrallon, healing is by providence of the deities and therefore healing is a gift provided by them. These spells are only available to deific specialized classes.

Spell Based Healing
  • Clerics, Druids, Spellcasting Rangers, and Paladins get their gift directly from their deity.
  • Warlocks receive the gift from their Patron.
  • Bards and Artificers would not normally be allowed to cast healing spells, however, if the character is a devout follower of a specific deity, then they would be gifted this ability.

Regardless if the gift is provided by Deity or by Patron, this ability can be taken away if abused (through their eyes) or you fall out of favor with them.

Specific Healing Spell Rules
  • The spells Raise Dead, Resurrection (including True Resurrection), and Reincarnate are not gained by PCs through leveling. The secrets of Life and Death are a closely kept secret with the Gods. That does not mean that one could not get access to such a spell. If they are the appropriate level to cast the spell, they would need to petition their deity directly to receive this boon. Earning this favor will likely involve a side quest of some sort and the character would likely only be able to cast it a very limited number of times, likely only once.
  • The wizard spell Wish cannot be used to replicate on of the above spells.
  • The spell Regenerate will only regenerate lost limbs or body parts when the missing piece is present at the time of the casting. There is a chance that this will fail depending on how much of the part is present and how degraded it is. The spell works normally otherwise.
  • The spell Revivify will use Matt Mercer’s modifications for Critical Roll. The character casting the spell makes a ‘Rapid Resurrection’ check, rolling a d20 and adding their spellcasting ability modifier. The DC starts at 10 and increases by 1 for each previous ‘resurrection’ attempted (both successful and failed) the character has undergone. If successful, the spell goes off as normal and the character is revived. On a failure, the character’s soul is not lost, but no further attempts can be made to restore this character to life with this spell. Only a spell, such as Raise Dead, Resurrection (including True Resurrection), and Reincarnate, will be able to resurrect this character.
Natural Healing

These two optional rules from the DMG, Slow Natural Healing and Healer’s Kit Dependency are going to be combined into one house rule.

  • Long Rest — Characters don’t regain hit points at the end of a long rest. Instead, a character can spend Hit Dice to heal at the end of a long rest, just as with a short rest. All other aspects of a Long Rest apply.
  • Short Rest — A character can’t spend any Hit Dice after finishing a short rest until someone expends one use of a healer’s kit to bandage and treat the character’s wounds. Furthermore, if the character using the healer’s kit is proficient in Medicine, then their patient gets advantage on the hit die roll.
Alternative Rules Used Lingering Injuries

At times, characters get injured in ways that healing may not be able to completely heal. In these events, a lingering injury may be applied. Now this is not the official mechanic and there is no dice roll. An injury will be applied, along with an appropriate penalty, when there is a story or plot point that occurs. This will also take effect if something drastic happens. For example, a boulder rolls down at you and you fail to get out of the way. This may occur in some broken bones or internal injuries depending on circumstances. The exception to this will be scars. Scars will happen when a character takes a significant amount of damage in one attack. In addition to the damage taken, they will get a scar. Depending on the scar and where its placed, there may be bonuses or penalties applied.

Loyalty

A NPC’s loyalty is measured on a numerical scale from 0 to 20. The NPC’s maximum loyalty score is equal to the highest Charisma score among all adventurers in the party, and its starting loyalty score is half that number. If these Charisma scores change, then the NPC’s loyalty will change as well. The NPC Loyalty score will not be shared with the characters. Loyalty scores can also be applied to organizations as well.

Inspiration

The GM may award Inspiration at any point that he sees fit, generally for roleplaying or extraordinary actions during the session. These awards are valid only for the game session that it was awarded in. Inspiration does not carry over to the next session.

Massive Damage

This optional rule makes it easier for a creature to be felled by massive damage. Please Note, this applies only to opponents and does NOT apply to player characters.
When a creature takes damage from a single source equal to or greater than half its hit point maximum, it must succeed on a DC 15 Constitution saving throw or suffer a random effect determined by a roll on the System Shock table.
For example, a creature that has a hit point maximum of 30 must make that Constitution save if it takes 15 damage or more from a single source.

System Shock
d10 Result Effect
1
The creature drops to 0 hit points and is dead.
2 – 3
The creature drops to 0 hit points but is stable.
4 – 5
The creature is stunned until the end of its next turn.
6 – 7
The creature can’t take reactions and has disadvantage on attack rolls and ability checks until the end of its next turn.
8 – 10
The creature can’t take reactions until the end of its next turn.
Character Creation Guidelines

Below are the rules for creating a character in the world of Imrallon.

Ability Score Generation
  • Roll a series of 4d6 and drop the lowest number to get a score.
  • A series can be scrapped at any point, but once it is scrapped, you can not return to it.
  • You may scrap a series only four times. On the fifth series, the scores are final.
  • Once a series is finalized, they can be assigned as desired.
  • Any racial modifiers are applied after the scores are assigned.
Race Selection

The world of Imrallon is full of a variety of different races, cultures and societies. Players can choose from the following races for their player character. Please note that Dragonborn, despite being a core race, is not present in this world.
The following races from the Player’s Handbook are allowed.

Aasimar

Aasimar have a family bloodline that is celestial in nature and are born to serve as champions of the gods. When the awakening occurs, they develop a luminous and glowing aura that reveals their celestial heritage. They also start to receive visions and guidance from entities through dreams. These dreams help shape an aasimar, granting a sense of destiny and ominous portent. When, and if, the aasimar gains a patron, they are “assigned” a specific agent that will provide guidance. This guidance is not a direct command or spoken words. Instead, they receive this guidance through visions, prophecies, and feelings.
The guide is far from omniscient. Its guidance is based on its understanding of the tenets of their gods, and it might have insight into combating especially
powerful foes that it knows about. Generally, all aasimar tend to stick with their ordained celestial path. If their angelic guides abandon them for any reason, they are generally replaced with evil ones. Even aasimar wholly dedicated to good sometimes feel torn between two worlds.
Aasimars in Imrallon are members of the Beacon Races and have the same Racial stats that are in Volo’s Guide to Monsters

Centaur

Deep within the ancient forests of Imrallon, the centaurs roam wild and free. They form small conclaves that generally have multiple family units. For the most part, then tend to keep to themselves and are very weary of outsiders. The exception to this are Satyrs and Elves, centaurs tend to form tight alliances with them. It’s said that if you were to earn the trust of a centaur enclave, then you are indeed worthy. Trust and integrity are key for centaurs. Centaurs rarely use family names. Instead they wear ornamental trinkets and symbols that represent their family membership. Male centaurs are known simply as centaurs while females are known as centaurides.

Nature’s Calvary

Centaurs have the upper bodies, down to the waist, of muscular humans, displaying all the human variety of skin tones and features. Their ears are slightly pointed, but their faces are wider and squarer than those of elves. Below the waist, they have the bodies of small horses, with a similar range of coloration, from various shades of chestnut or bay to dappled or even zebra-like striped patterns. Most centaurs bear tribal-styled tattoos that cover both their torso and their equine body. Both the tail and their hair tends to get similar treatment as centaurs wear various styles of trinkets. Centaurs are smaller than a human rider mounted on a horse, but they fill very similar roles as cavalry warriors. messengers, outriders, and scouts.

Isolated Conclaves

Centaurs celebrate life, growth and festivities. At the same time, they revere, preserve and honor the traditions of the past. They are voices of memory and history, preserving old ways and keeping alive the legends of ancestral heroes. Each conclave tends to have a Theopompus, which is their historian, that knows the stories of the past and shares them when they are pertinent. Generally, these stories are past through oral traditions and not many are written down. Centaurs find sheer delight when they get the chance to run with other wild creatures, it makes them feel closer to nature. Most of the time, the collective centaur conclaves tend to stay out of urban or civilized areas, preferring the solitude that nature can provide. When it comes to the other races, centaurs get along passably but are extremely weary of newcomers and staunchly committed to those they call friends. The path from newcomer to friend is a long one.

Centaur Religion

Most centaurs worship Poseidon as the god of horses, but they also tend to worship nature deities. Each centaur enclave may or may not have the same patron for them. Often differing enclaves go to war over their patrons. Every conclave settlement though does have a shrine dedicated to their patron.

  • Legacy of Chiron
    Centaurs regard Chiron as one of their patrons, though Chiron is not a deity. However, Chiron‘s demigod status allows him to gift his chosen children. Nearly every centaur has some sort of trinket or token to show his reverence for him. Due to this, centaurs that desecrate or disparage Chiron‘s name are met with swift retribution. The few centaurs that follow his legacy and take the mantle of teacher are held in the highest esteem.
Other Race Relations
  • Elves.One could always count on an elf. The bond between elf and a centaur friends tends to prove unbreakable.
  • Dwarves.A dwarf clan is as sequestered and isolated as a centaur conclave. Sure they have great smiths and make great ale, but you get one out in the deep forest, they lose their minds.
  • Humans.A human is a curious lot. They have all this ambition and drive, but don’t take the time to stop and appreciate it all. What is admirable about them is their dedication. Once they set their hearts on something, they’ll get it, whether it’s a dragon’s hoard or an empire’s throne. Eventhough most of the time, it gets them in trouble.
Centaur Names

Centaurs have only one name, but that one name carries the weight of the centaur’s entire familial bloodline. Whenever a foal is born, the conclave has a naming ceremony. The Theopompus would recite those in the family line that have recently passed. Elements of these names are pieced together and given to the new foal. They believe that this keeps the fallen family members spirits with the new generations.

  • Male Names: Anelia, Jasmeithes, Drakandras, Casteimon, Baccagio
  • Female Names: Diominos, Iereus, Pavlya, Sinali, Inampos, Gisiva
Centaur Traits

Your centaur character has the following racial traits.

  • Ability Score Increase Your Strength score increases by 2, and your Wisdom score increases by 1
  • Age Centaurs mature and age at about the same rate as humans, but can live 90 to 150 years.
  • Alignment Centaurs are inclined toward neutrality and the wild nature of their hearts tend to be chaotic. Very few tend to desire a life with rigid and strict structure.
  • Size Centaurs stand between 6 and 7 feet tall, with their equine bodies reaching about 4 feet at the withers. Your size is Medium.
  • Speed Your base walking speed is 40 feet.
  • Hooves Your hooves are natural melee weapons, which you can use to make unarmed strikes. If you hit with them, you deal bludgeoning damage equal to 1d4 + your Strength modifier. Your hooves also require horseshoes and you cannot wear boots. All magical boots have horseshoe equivalents.
  • Equine Build You count as one size larger when determining your carrying capacity and the weight you can push or drag. In addition, any climb that requires hands and feet is especially difficult for you because of your hooves. When you make such a climb, each foot of movement costs you 4 extra feet, instead of the normal 1 extra foot. Additionally, a Medium or smaller creature can ride on your equine back if you allow it. In such a situation, you continue to act independently, not as a controlled mount.
  • Survivor You have proficiency in one tool of your choice and one of the following skills: Animal Handling, Medicine, Nature, or Survival.
  • Hybrid Nature You have two creature types: humanoid and monstrosity. You can be affected by a game effect if it works on either of your creature types.
  • Mounted Combat You are considered mounted for feats, skill and abilities that utilize mounted combat.
  • Centaur Weapons Training Centaurs are trained in weapons that utilize their powerful bodies. You gain Proficiency with Tridents, Polearms, and Longbows.
  • Languages You can speak, read, and write Common and Sylvan.
Centaur Random Height and Weight
Centaur Subrace Base Height Height Modifier Base Weight Weight Modifier
Centaur (Cretan) 5′ 4″ +2d12 1,400 lb. x (2d20) lb.
Mustang 5′ 2″ +2d12 1,200 lb. x (2d20) lb.
Clydesdale 6′ 0″ +2d8 1,300 lb. x (5d20) lb.
Shetland 4′ 0″ +2d6 500 lb. x (3d12) lb.
Subraces

There are four different subtypes of centaurs in Imrallon. When most people use the word “centaur”, the cretan centaur is what they mean. Cretans are the quintessential centaur and the most varied in appearance. They have the base benefits that are listed above. Mustangs are very similar to Cretans, but tend to be faster and slightly smaller. Clydesdales are the largest and most powerful of the centaurs. Opposite of the Clydesdale are the Shetlands. They are the smallest of the race, but have the potential to be gifted with some innate magical abilities. Subraces have all of the racial abilities as a normal centaur. The listed benefits replace the standard benefit.

Mustang

The most common subrace, and what most people think of when they think of a Centaur. They are fast and powerful. Their fur tends to come in the same colors as other centaurs, but they tend to have more solid coloring with small patches. As a Mustang, you gain the following benefits:

  • Ability Score Increase Your Dexterity increases by 2, and your Wisdom increases by 1.
  • Speed Your base walking speed is 45 feet.
  • Mustang Weapons Training Mustangs are trained in weapons that are useful for fast and mobile troops. You gain Proficiency with Spears, Scimitars, Javelins, and Light Crossbows.
Clydesdale

Clydesdales are the most imposing subrace of the centaurs. Their fur comes in solid, dark colors with light colors at the base of their legs. A Clydesdale’s human half tends to run more on the muscular side and are darker skinned. As a Clydesdale, you gain the following benefits:

  • Ability Score Increase Your Constitution increases by 2, and your Charisma increases by 1.
  • Clydesdale Weapons Training Clydesdales are trained in weapons that are useful for heavy infantry troops. You gain Proficiency with Greatswords, Polearms, and Longbows.
Shetland

The smallest of the centaurs, Shetlands stand about the same height as humans, and are not as long as their bigger brethren. Those that don’t usually can be found in rocky plains, foothills, or mountains. Their horse appearance is that of a pony or a smaller equine-type creatures like goats or donkeys. The humanoid appearance tends toward dwarven or halfling features. On average they weigh about 400 pounds, and are 4 to 6 feet tall. As a Shetland, you gain the following benefits:

  • Ability Score Increase Your Wisdom increases by 2, and your Strength increases by 1.
  • Speed Your base walking speed is 35 feet, due to your shorter legs.
  • Shetland Weapons Training Shetlands are trained in weapons that are useful for mobile troops. You gain Proficiency with Nets, Short Swords, and Shortbows.
Racial Feats Fast On Your Feet

Prerequisite: Centaur
It takes heavy training to get your legs maximized to the pinnacle of perfection. You gain the following benefits:

  • Increase your Strength, or Dexterity by 1 up to a maximum of 20.
  • Attacks of opportunity that are made against you when moving are at a disadvantage.
  • Your hooves now deal damage one die higher than before (d4 to d6).
Companion Calvary

Prerequisite: Centaur
You have trained hard with a partner to maximize your combat potential with a rider. You gain the following benefits:

  • When you make a melee weapon attack or melee spell attack after moving at least 20 feet towards a creature, your mounted ally can spend their reaction to also make an attack against it.
  • When you and your rider roll initiative at the start of combat, you may choose to share the higher of the two rolls.
  • When a creature makes a weapon attack against your rider, you can force yourself to become the target instead.
Routing Charger:

Prerequisite: Centaur
You are a dangerous foe to face for an unmounted opponent, and your intimidating presence can cause enemies to break ranks and flee. You remain relentless in your pursuit of a fleeing foe. You gain the following benefits:

  • You gain proficiency with the Intimidation skill if you don’t have it already.
  • When a hostile creature uses the disengage action within 5 ft of you, you can use your reaction to move up to half your speed towards them without provoking opportunity attacks.
  • You have advantage on attack rolls against creatures that are smaller than you that are if they are frightened of you.
Chiron’s Blessing

Prerequisite: Centaur (Shetland)
Your family bloodline is lucky enough to be blessed by Chiron. The once dormant magic now courses through your veins, providing you with innate spell casting abilities. You gain the following benefits:

  • You learn one cleric cantrip of your choice. You also learn Entangle, which you can cast once per long rest. Wisdom is your spellcasting ability for both spells.
  • Shimmering Shield. As a reaction, you can create a 30′ diameter, shimmering, magical field around yourself, and any other creatures within the field’s diameter. You increase the targeted creature’s AC equal to your proficiency bonus until the start of your next turn. You then can’t use this feature again until you complete a long rest.
Author’s Note

This version is a combination of the Centaur race in the Unearthed Arcana and Guildmaster’s Guide to Ravinca versions, along with some original content.
The Centaur Playable Race is unofficial Fan Content permitted under the Fan Content Policy. Not approved/endorsed by Wizards. Portions of the materials used are property of Wizards of the Coast. ©Wizards of the Coast LLC.

Dwarves

The dwarves of Imrallon were created by Hephaestus to assist him with creating items during the Titan Wars. Afterwards, the dwarven clans spread far and wide into the various mountain ranges across the lands. However, they all still consider the fabled Mt Blackrock as their ancestral home. They have kingdoms that are rich in ancient grandeur, halls carved into the roots of mountains, the echoing of picks and hammers in deep mines. Huge blazing forges in honor of their creator, a true commitment to clan and tradition, and a burning hatred of goblins and orcs, these common threads unite all dwarves.

Short and Stout

Bold and hardy, dwarves are known as skilled warriors, miners, and workers of stone and metal. Though they stand well under 5 feet tall, dwarves are so broad and compact that they can weigh as much as a human standing nearly two feet taller. Their courage and endurance are also easily a match for any of the larger folk.
Dwarven skin ranges from deep brown to a paler hue tinged with red, but the most common shades are light brown or deep tan, like certain tones of earth. Their hair, worn long but in simple styles, is usually black, gray, or brown, though paler dwarves often have red hair. Male dwarves value their beards highly and groom them carefully, some even adorn them with various trinkets.

Long Memory, Long Grudges

Dwarves can live to be more than 400 years old, so the oldest living dwarves often remember a very different world. For example, some of the oldest dwarves living in Nag Moldir can recall the day, more than three centuries ago, when the orcs of the Cheocirian Empire conquered the fortress and drove them into an exile that lasted over 250 years. This longevity grants them a perspective on the world that shorter-lived races such as humans and halflings lack.
Dwarves are solid and enduring like the mountains they love, weathering the passage of centuries with stoic endurance and little change. They respect the traditions of their clans, tracing their ancestry back to the founding of their most ancient strongholds in the youth of the world, and don’t abandon those traditions lightly. Part of those traditions is devotion to their creator Hephaestus, who uphold the dwarven ideals of industrious labor, skill in battle, and devotion to the forge.
Individual dwarves are determined and loyal, true to their word and decisive in action, sometimes to the point of stubbornness. Many dwarves have a strong sense of justice, and they are slow to forget wrongs they have suffered. A wrong done to one dwarf is a wrong done to the dwarf’s entire clan, so what begins as one dwarf’s hunt for vengeance can becom e a full-blown clan feud.

Clans and Kingdoms

Dwarven kingdoms stretch deep beneath the mountains where the dwarves mine gems and precious metals and forge items of wonder. They love the beauty and artistry of precious metals and fine jewelry, and in some dwarves this love festers into avarice. Whatever wealth they can’t find in their mountains, they gain through trade. They dislike boats, so enterprising humans and halflings frequently handle trade in dwarven goods along water routes. Trustworthy members of other races are welcome in dwarf settlements, though some areas are off limits even to them.
The chief unit of dwarven society is the clan, and dwarves highly value social standing. Even dwarves who live far from their own kingdoms cherish their clan identities and affiliations, recognize related dwarves, and invoke their ancestors’ names in oaths and curses. To be clanless is the worst fate that can befall a dwarf. The dwarves of the lands are typically artisans, especially weaponsmiths, armorers, and jewelers. Some become mercenaries or bodyguards, highly sought after for their courage and loyalty.

Gods,Gold,and Clan

Dwarves who take up the adventuring life might be motivated by a desire for treasure, for its own sake, for a specific purpose, or even out of an altruistic desire to help others. Other dwarves are driven by the command or inspiration of a deity, a direct calling or simply a desire to bring glory to Hephaestus. Clan and ancestry are also important motivators. A dwarf might seek to restore a clan’s lost honor, avenge an ancient wrong the clan suffered, or earn a new place within the clan after having been exiled. Or a dwarf might search for the axe wielded by a mighty ancestor, lost on the field of battle centuries ago.
The dwarves of Imrallon use the same racial stats as in the Player’s Handbook.

Eladrine

Eladrine have a family bloodline that is fey in nature can be wildly unpredictable. Eladrine are the only ones that are not born human, they are born elven. When they have their awakening event and their abilities emerge, their appearance makes drastic changes. These changes are based on their moods and the seasons. Each seasonal mood is significantly different from each other and as unique as the individual. Depending on the elves that they were born to, the emergence of an Eladrine will cause them to be either embraced as a blessed event or shunned in exile and shame. Eladrin that embrace good or evil tend to take their beliefs to an extreme, serving as great champions of justice or terrifying villains.
Eladrine in Imrallon are members of the Beacon Races and have the same Racial stats that are in Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes.

Elves

Elves are a magical people of otherworldly grace, created by the twin deities Artemis and Apollo. They live in places of ethereal beauty, in the midst of ancient forests or in silvery spires glittering with faerie light, where soft music drifts through the air and gentle fragrances waft on the breeze. Elves love nature and magic, art and artistry, music and poetry, and the good things of the world.

Slender and Graceful

With their unearthly grace and fine features, elves appear hauntingly beautiful to humans and members of many other races. They are slightly shorter than humans on average, ranging from well under 5 feet tall to just over 6 feet. They are more slender than humans, weighing only 100 to 145 pounds. Males and females are about the same height, and males are only marginally heavier than females. Elves’ coloration encompasses the normal human range and also includes skin in shades of copper, bronze, and almost bluish-white, hair of green or blue, and eyes like pools of liquid gold or silver. Elves have no facial and little body hair. They favor elegant clothing in bright colors, and they enjoy simple yet lovely jewelry.

A Timeless Perspective

Elves can live well over 700 years, giving them a broad perspective on events that might trouble the shorter lived races more deeply. They are more often amused than excited, and more likely to be curious than greedy. They tend to remain aloof and unfazed by petty happenstance. When pursuing a goal, however, whether adventuring on a mission or learning a new skill or art, elves can be focused and relentless. They are slow to make friends and enemies, and even slower to forget them. They reply to petty insults with disdain and to serious insults with vengeance.
Like the branches of a young tree, elves are flexible in the face of danger. They trust in diplomacy and compromise to resolve differences before they escalate to violence. They have been known to retreat from intrusions into their woodland homes, confident that they can simply wait the invaders out. But when the need arises, elves reveal a stern martial side, demonstrating skill with sword, bow, and strategy.

Hidden Woodland Realms

Their ancestral homelands are the forest realms of Altegia. Most elves dwell in small forest villages hidden among the trees. Elves hunt game, gather food, and grow vegetables, and their skill and magic allow them to support themselves without the need for clearing and plowing land. They are talented artisans, crafting finely worked clothes and art objects. Their contact with outsiders is usually limited, though a few elves make a good living by trading crafted items for metals (which they have no interest in mining).
Elves encountered outside their own lands are commonly traveling minstrels, artists, or sages. Human nobles compete for the services of elf instructors to teach swordplay or magic to their children.

Exploration and Adventure

Elves take up adventuring out of wanderlust. Since they are so long-lived, they can enjoy centuries of exploration and discovery. They dislike the pace of human society, which is regimented from day to day but constantly changing over decades, so they find careers that let them travel freely and set their own pace. Elves also enjoy exercising their martial prowess or gaining greater magical power, and adventuring allows them to do so. Some mightjoin with rebels fighting against oppression, and others might become champions of moral causes.
The elves of Imrallon use the same racial stats as in the Player’s Handbook, however, the Drow subrace is not a playable race.

Gnomes

A constant hum of busy activity pervades the warrens and neighborhoods where gnomes form their closeknit communities. Louder sounds punctuate the hum: a crunch of grinding gears here, a minor explosion there, a yelp of surprise or triumph, and especially bursts of laughter. Gnomes take delight in life, enjoying every moment of invention, exploration, investigation, creation, and play.

Vibrant Expression

A gnome’s energy and enthusiasm for living shines through every inch of his or her tiny body. Gnomes average slightly over 3 feet tall and weigh 40 to 45 pounds. Their tan or brown faces are usually adorned with broad smiles (beneath their prodigious noses), and their bright eyes shine with excitement. Their fair hair has a tendency to stick out in every direction, as if expressing the gnom e’s insatiable interest in everything around. A gnome’s personality is writ large in his or her appearance. A male gnome’s beard, in contrast to his wild hair, is kept carefully trimmed but often styled into curious forks or neat points. A gnome’s clothing, though usually made in modest earth tones, is elaborately decorated with embroidery, embossing, or gleaming jewels.

Delighted Dedication

As far as gnomes are concerned, being alive is a wonderful thing, and they squeeze every ounce of enjoyment out of their three to five centuries of life. Humans might wonder about getting bored over the course of such a long life, and elves take plenty of time to savor the beauties of the world in their long years, but gnomes seem to worry that even with all that time, they can’t get in enough of the things they want to do and see.
Gnomes speak as if they can’t get the thoughts out of their heads fast enough. Even as they offer ideas and opinions on a range of subjects, they still manage to listen carefully to others, adding the appropriate exclamations of surprise and appreciation along the way.
Though gnomes love jokes of all kinds, particularly puns and pranks, they’re just as dedicated to the more serious tasks they undertake. Many gnomes are skilled engineers, alchemists, tinkers, and inventors. They’re willing to make mistakes and laugh at themselves in the process of perfecting what they do, taking bold (sometimes foolhardy) risks and dreaming large.

Bright Burrows

Gnomes make their homes in hilly, wooded lands. They live underground but get more fresh air than dwarves do, enjoying the natural, living world on the surface whenever they can. Their homes are well hidden by both clever construction and simple illusions. Welcome visitors are quickly ushered into the bright, warm burrows. Those who are not welcome are unlikely to find the burrows in the first place.
Gnomes who settle in human lands are commonly gemcutters, engineers, sages, or tinkers. Some human families retain gnome tutors, ensuring that their pupils enjoy a mix of serious learning and delighted enjoyment. A gnome might tutor several generations of a single human family over the course of his or her long life.

Seeing the World

Curious and impulsive, gnomes might take up adventuring as a way to see the world or for the love of exploring. As lovers of gems and other fine items, some gnomes take to adventuring as a quick, if dangerous, path to wealth. Regardless of what spurs them to adventure, gnomes who adopt this way of life eke as much enjoyment out of it as they do out of any other activity they undertake, sometimes to the great annoyance of their adventuring companions.
The gnomes of Imrallon use the same racial stats as in the Player’s Handbook.

Half-Elf

Walking in two worlds but truly belonging to neither, half-elves combine what some say are the best qualities of their elf and human parents: human curiosity, inventiveness, and ambition tempered by the refined senses, love of nature, and artistic tastes of the elves. Some half-elves live among humans, set apart by their emotional and physical differences, watching friends and loved ones age while time barely touches them. Others live with the elves, growing restless as they reach adulthood in the timeless elven realms, while their peers continue to live as children. Many half-elves, unable to fit into either society, choose lives of solitary wandering or join with other misfits and outcasts in
the adventuring life.

Of Two Worlds

To humans, half-elves look like elves, and to elves, they look human. In height, they’re on par with both parents, though they’re neither as slender as elves nor as broad as humans. They range from under 5 feet to about 6 feet tall, and from 100 to 180 pounds, with men only slightly taller and heavier than women. Half-elf men do have facial hair, and sometimes grow beards to mask their elven ancestry. Half-elven coloration and features lie somewhere between their human and elf parents, and thus show a variety even more pronounced than that found among either race. They tend to have the eyes of their elven parents.

Diplomats or Wanderers

Half-elves have no lands of their own, though they are welcome in human cities and somewhat less welcome in elven forests. In large cities in regions where elves and humans interact often, half-elves are sometimes numerous enough to form small communities of their own. They enjoy the company of other half-elves, the only people who truly understand what it is to live between these two worlds.
In most parts of the world, though, half-elves are uncommon enough that one might live for years without meeting another. Some half-elves prefer to avoid company altogether, wandering the wilds as trappers, foresters, hunters, or adventurers and visiting civilization only rarely. Like elves, they are driven by the wanderlust that comes of their longevity. Others, in contrast, throw themselves into the thick of society, putting their charisma and social skills to great use in diplomatic roles or as swindlers.
The half-elves of Imrallon use the same racial stats as in the Player’s Handbook.

Half-Orc

Whether united under the leadership of a mighty warlock or having fought to a standstill after years of conflict, orc and human tribes sometimes form alliances, joining forces into a larger horde to the terror of civilized lands nearby. When these alliances are sealed by marriages, half-orcs are born. Some half-orcs rise to become proud chiefs of orc tribes, their human blood giving them an edge over their full-blooded orc rivals. Some venture into the world to prove their worth among humans and other more civilized races. Many of these become adventurers, achieving greatness for their mighty deeds and notoriety for their barbaric customs and savage fury.

Scarred and Strong

Half-orcs’ grayish pigmentation, sloping foreheads, jutting jaws, prominent teeth, and towering builds make their orcish heritage plain for all to see. Half-orcs stand between 6 and 7 feet tall and usually weigh between 180 and 250 pounds.
Orcs regard battle scars as tokens of pride and ornamental scars as things of beauty. Other scars, though, mark an orc or half-orc as a former slave or a disgraced exile. Any half-orc who has lived among or near orcs has scars, whether they are marks of humiliation or of pride, recounting their past exploits and injuries. Such a half-orc living among humans might display these scars proudly or hide them in shame.

The Mark of Ares

Ares, the god of war, created the orcs, and even those orcs who turn away from his worship can’t fully escape his influence. The same is true of half-orcs, though their human blood moderates the impact of their orcish heritage. Some half-orcs hear the whispers of Ares in their dreams, calling them to unleash the rage that simmers within them. Others feel Ares’s exultation when they join in melee combat—and either exult along with him or shiver with fear and loathing. Half-orcs are not evil by nature, but evil does lurk within them, whether they embrace it or rebel against it.
Beyond the rage of Ares, half-orcs feel emotion powerfully. Rage doesn’tjust quicken their pulse, it makes their bodies burn. An insult stings like acid, and sadness saps their strength. But they laugh loudly and heartily, and simple bodily pleasures—feasting, drinking, wrestling, drumming, and wild dancing, fill their hearts with joy. They tend to be short-tempered and sometimes sullen, more inclined to action than contemplation and to fighting than arguing. The most accomplished half-orcs are those with enough self control to get by in a civilized land.

Tribes and Slums

Half-orcs most often live among orcs. Of the other races, humans are most likely to accept half-orcs, and halforcs almost always live in human lands when not living among orc tribes. Whether proving themselves among rough barbarian tribes or scrabbling to survive in the slums of larger cities, half-orcs get by on their physical might, their endurance, and the sheer determination they inherit from their human ancestry.
The half-orcs of Imrallon use the same racial stats as in the Player’s Handbook.

Halflings

The comforts of home are the goals of mist halflings’ lives: a place to settle in peace and quiet, far from marauding monsters and clashing armies; a blazing fire and a generous meal; fine drink and fine conversation. Though some halflings live out their days in remote agricultural communities, others form nomadic bands that travel constantly, lured by the open road and the wide horizon to discover the wonders of new lands and peoples. But even these wanderers love peace, food, hearth, and home, though home might be a wagon jostling along an dirt road or a raft floating downriver.

Small and Practical

The diminutive halflings survive in a world full of larger creatures by avoiding notice or, barring that, avoiding offense. Standing about 3 feet tall, they appear relatively harmless and so have managed to survive for centuries in the shadow of empires and on the edges of wars and political strife. They are inclined to be stout, weighing between 40 and 45 pounds.
Halflings’ skin ranges from tan to pale with a ruddy cast, and their hair is usually brown or sandy brown and wavy. They have brown or hazel eyes. Halfling men often sport long sideburns, but beards are rare among them and mustaches even more so. They like to wear simple, comfortable, and practical clothes, favoring bright colors.
Halfling practicality extends beyond their clothing. They’re concerned with basic needs and simple pleasures and have little use for ostentation. Even the wealthiest ofhalflings keep their treasures locked in a cellar rather than on display for all to see. They have
a knack for finding the most straightforward solution to a problem, and have little patience for dithering.

Kind and Curious

Halflings are an affable and cheerful people. They cherish the bonds of family and friendship as well as the comforts of hearth and home, harboring few dreams of gold or glory. Even adventurers among them usually venture into the world for reasons of community, friendship, wanderlust, or curiosity. They love discovering new things, even simple things, such as an exotic food or an unfamiliar style of clothing. Halflings are easily moved to pity and hate to see any living thing suffer. They are generous, happily sharing what they have even in lean times.

Blend into the Crowd

Halflings are adept at fitting into a community of humans, dwarves, or elves, making themselves valuable and welcome. The combination of their inherent stealth and their unassuming nature helps halflings to avoid unwanted attention. Halflings work readily with others, and they are loyal to their friends, whether halfling or otherwise. They can display remarkable ferocity when their friends, families, or communities are threatened.

Pastoral Pleasantries

Most halflings live in small, peaceful communities with large farms and well-kept groves. They rarely build kingdoms of their own or even hold much land beyond their quiet shires. They typically don’t recognize any sort of halfling nobility or royalty, instead looking to family elders to guide them. Families preserve their traditional ways despite the rise and fall of empires.
Many halflings live among other races, where the halflings’ hard work and loyal outlook offer them abundant rewards and creature comforts. Some halfling communities travel as a way of life, driving wagons or guiding boats from place to place and maintaining no permanent home.

Exploring Opportunities

Halflings usually set out on the adventurer’s path to defend their communities, support their friends, or explore a wide and wonder-filled world. For them, adventuring is less a career than an opportunity or sometimes a necessity.
The halflings of Imrallon use the same racial stats as in the Player’s Handbook.

Humans

In the reckonings of Imrallon, humans are the youngest of the common races, late to arrive on the world scene and short-lived in comparison to dwarves, elves, and dragons. Perhaps it is because of their shorter lives that they strive to achieve as much as they can in the years they are given. Or maybe they feel they have something to prove to the elder races, and that’s why they build their mighty empires on the foundation of conquest and trade. Whatever drives them, humans are the innovators, the achievers, and the pioneers of the world.

A Broad Spectrum

With their penchant for migration and conquest, humans are more physically diverse than other common races. There is no typical human. An individual can stand from 5 feet to a little over 6 feet tall and weigh from 125 to 250 pounds. Human skin shades range from nearly black to very pale, and hair colors from black to blond (curly, kinky, or straight); males might sport facial hair that is sparse or thick. A lot of humans have a dash of nonhuman blood, revealing hints of elf, orc, or other lineages. Humans reach adulthood in their late teens and rarely live even a single century.

Variety in All Things

Humans are the most adaptable and ambitious people among the common races. They have widely varying tastes, morals, and customs in the many different lands where they have settled. When they settle, though, they stay: they build cities to last for the ages, and great kingdoms that can persist for long centuries. An individual human might have a relatively short life span, but a human nation or culture preserves traditions with origins far beyond the reach of any single human’s memory. They live fully in the present—making them well suited to the adventuring life—but also plan for the future, striving to leave a lasting legacy. Individually and as a group, humans are adaptable opportunists, and they stay alert to changing political and social dynamics.

Lasting Institutions

Where a single elf or dwarf might take on the responsibility of guarding a special location or a powerful secret, humans found sacred orders and institutions for such purposes. While dwarf clans and halfling elders pass on the ancient traditions to each new generation, human temples, governments, libraries, and codes of law fix their traditions in the bedrock of history. Humans dream of immortality, but (except for those few who seek undeath or divine ascension to escape death’s clutches) they achieve it by ensuring that they will be remembered when they are gone.
Although some humans can be xenophobic, in general their societies are inclusive. Human lands welcome large numbers of nonhumans compared to the proportion of humans who live in nonhuman lands.

Exemplars of Ambition

Humans who seek adventure are the most daring and ambitious members of a daring and ambitious race. They seek to earn glory in the eyes of their fellows
by amassing power, wealth, and fame. More than other people, humans champion causes rather than territories or groups.
The humans of Imrallon use the same racial stats as in the Player’s Handbook.

Kenku

Haunted by an ancient crime that robbed them of their wings, the kenku wander the world as vagabonds and burglars who live at the edge of human society. Kenku suffer from a sinister reputation that is not wholly unearned, but they can prove to be valuable allies.

An Ancient Curse

The kenku once served an unknown, mysterious, powerful entity. Some believe they were minions of Grazz’t, while others say that they were scouts and explorers for the demon lords of the Abyss. Whatever the truth, according to legend, the kenku betrayed their master. Unable to resist the lure of a beautiful sparkling treasure, the kenku plotted to steal the item and escape to the Material Plane.
Unfortunately for the kenku, their master discovered their plan before they could enact it. Enraged, the entity imposed three dreadful curses upon them. First, the kenku’s beloved wings withered and fell away from their bodies, leaving them bound to the earth. Second, because their ingenuity and skill had turned toward scheming against their patron, the spark of creativity was torn from their souls. Finally, to ensure that the kenku could never divulge any secrets, their master took away their voices. Once the entity was satisfied that they had been sufficiently punished, the kenku were set loose on the Material Plane.
Since then, the kenku have wandered the world. They settle in places that accept them, usually bleak cities that have fallen on hard times and are overrun with crime.

Dreams of Flight

Above all else, kenku wish to regain their ability to fly. Every kenku is born with a desire to take to the air, and those who learn spellcasting do so in hope of mastering spells that will allow them to fly. Rumors of magic items such as flying carpets, brooms capable of flight, and similar objects provoke a great desire for the kenku to acquire the items for themselves.
Despite their lack of wings, kenku love dwelling in towers and other tall structures. They seek out ruins that reach to the sky, though they lack the motivation and creativity to make repairs or fortify such places.
Even so, their light weight and size allow them to dwell in rickety structures that would collapse beneath a human or an orc. Some thieves’ guilds use kenku as lookouts and messengers. The kenku dwell in the tallest buildings and towers the guild controls, allowing them to lurk in the highest levels and to keep watch on the city below.

Hopeless Plagiarists

As a result of their lack of creativity, kenku function comfortably as minions of a powerful master. Flock leaders enforce discipline and minimize conflicts, but they fail at effective planning or crafting longterm schemes.
Although unable to speak in,their own voices, kenku can perfectly mimic any sound they hear, from a halfling’s voice to the noise of rocks clattering down a hillside. However, kenku cannot create new sounds and can communicate only by using sounds they have heard. Most kenku use a combination of overheard phrases and sound effects to convey their ideas and thoughts. By the same token, kenku have no ability to invent new ideas or create new things. Kenku can copy existing items with exceptional skill, allowing them to become excellent artisans and scribes. They can copy books, make replicas of objects, and otherwise thrive in situations where they can produce large numbers of identical items. Few kenku find this work satisfying, since their quest for the freedom of flight makes them ill-suited to settle into a routine.

Ideal Minions

Kenku gather in groups called flocks. A flock is led by the oldest and most experienced kenku with the widest store of knowledge to draw on, often called Master.
Although kenku can’t create new things, they have a talent for learning and memorizing details. Thus, ambitious kenku can excel as superb spies and scouts. A kenku who learns of clever schemes and plans devised by other creatures can put them to use. The kenku lack the talent to improvise or alter a plan, but a wise Master sets multiple plans in motion at once, confident that underlings can follow orders to the letter.
For this reason, many kenku make an easy living serving as messengers, spies, and lookouts for thieves’ guilds, bandits, and other criminal cartels. A network of kenku can relay a bird call or similar noise across the city, alerting their allies to the approach of a guard patrol or signaling a prime opportunity for a robbery.
Since kenku can precisely reproduce any sound, the messages they carry rarely suffer degradation or shifts in meaning. Human messengers might switch words or phrases and garble a message inadvertently, but the kenku produce perfect copies of whatever they hear.

Kenku Adventurers

Kenku adventurers are usually the survivors of a flock that has sustained heavy losses, or a rare kenku who has grown weary of a life of crime. These kenku are more ambitious and daring than their fellows. Others strike out on their own in search of the secrets of flight, to master magic, or to uncover the secret of their curse and find a method to break it.
Kenku adventurers, despite their relative independence, still have a tendency to seek out a companion to emulate and follow. A kenku loves to mimic the voice and words of its chosen companion.
Kenku characters in the world of Imrallon use the same racial stats that is in Volo’s Guide to Monsters.

Minotaur

The minotaurs of Imrallon are strong in mind, body, courage, and spirit. They are at home on both the battlefield and the sea. With a combination of burning fury in battle with keen tactics, minotaurs make excellent commanders as well as valuable shock troops. Minotaurs hold honor and clan above all else.

Horns and Hooves

Minotaurs are barrel-chested humanoids with the body of a human and the head of a bull. Their horns range from short, about a foot, to long, twisted and curled, which can be 3 to 4 feet. They are often sharp and decorated with ornamental rings, small trinkets or sheathed in iron. Minotaurs take great pride in their horns, so much so that breaking one outside of battle will bring shame on the family. Shaggy, thick and course fur extends from the top of their head, down their necks and muscled backs. Fur and skin coloring runs from light gray to coal black, though most Minotaur have red or brown fur and hair. Males tend to have long tufts of hair on their chins that often braided. Their powerful, muscular legs extend down to a cloven hoof. Minotaurs are born with long, tufted tails, but they have their tails docked as part of a coming-of-age ceremony. Social status, position and achievements are marked on a minotaur through various brands. These brands are considered marks of honor.

Master Mariners

Across Imrallon, minotaurs are both famed and feared for their seafaring prowess. Their devotion to the sea is one of righteousness. Ships that are built by minotaurs are a long sought after item. Every kingdom that has a port generally has a contingent of minotaurs that serve as shipwrights. Most minotaurs serve aboard a sailing vessel at some point in their lives. Minotaur vessels are large and strong enough to take the pounding of the waves, yet move with speed and elegance that is unmatched. While there are tribes of minotaurs that live their lives on land and never see the sea, every minotaur dreams of being on a ship and feeling the ocean breeze, the salty seawater spray, the waves that pound against the hull that matches the beat of their hearts.

Minotaur Religion

Minotaurs keep shrines in their homes and tokens on them to worship Poseidon. It’s nearly every minotaur’s dream to be on the sea, so worshiping the god of the sea is ingrained early on. However, there are instances where minotaurs have strayed from the sea and Poseidon. Often looking into the Abyss for power and worship the demon lord Baphomet. The corruption and evilness of these minotaurs lead them to leave society and into solitude or small cults. If discovered, is custom for minotaurs that leave in this way to be branded, both literally and physically, an outcast. Being branded an outcast brings shame and dishonor on their family name.

Symbols and Patterns

Patterns are important to minotaur, especially labyrinth ones. These symbols often appear on their clothing, armor, and weapons, and branded on their hides. Each pattern is particular to a clan, and the pattern’s size and complexity help minotaur identify family allegiance, caste and achievements.

Other Race Relations
  • Elves. “The elves can stay in their forests, the sea is owned by the minotaurs!
  • Dwarves. “A dwarf smith can make a good weapon or armor, but the bearded ones wont be caught dead on the open ocean.
  • Humans. “Humans are weak in body and mind, but a certain few have heart.
Minotaur Names

Minotaurs begin their adolescent lives with a name that is given by their parents. These names tend to be of heroes in the family’s past as a way of honoring their legacy. In early adulthood, they are given a surname that is based on actions, behavior or deeds that were done.

  • Male Names: Podtoron, Karrak, Trakrat, Hirdor, Astebur
  • Female Names: Hestris, Iasdra, Kirtagar, Darut, Estesia, Miramas, Irenan
  • Surnames: Goblinpelt, Wavebreaker, Stormspeaker
Minotaur Traits

Your minotaur character has the following racial traits.

  • Ability Score Increase Your Strength score increases by 2, and your Constitution score increases by 1
  • Age Minotaur age and mature at about the same rate as humans up to the age of 18. From then on they age slowly staying fit for at least 150 years.
  • Alignment Seafaring minotaurs temper their chaotic hearts with the strict regiment required to operate a sailing ship. Neutrality tends to be the normal with minotaurs, but there are plenty that are both that have good and evil ambitions.
  • Size Minotaurs average over 6 feet in height, and they have stocky builds. Your size is Medium.
  • Speed Your base walking speed is 30 feet.
  • Horns Your horns are natural melee weapons, which you can use to make unarmed strikes. If you hit with them, you deal piercing damage equal to 1d6 + your Strength modifier.
  • Goring Rush Immediately after you use the Dash action on your turn and move at least 20 feet, you can make one melee attack with your horns as a bonus action.
  • Imposing Presence You have proficiency in one of the following skills of your choice: Intimidation or Persuasion.
  • Tool Proficiency You have proficiency in any one tool of your choice.
  • Languages You can speak, read, and write Common and Minotaur.
  • Labyrinthine Recall You can perfectly recall any path you have traveled. You cannot become lost in any maze (dungeon, underground cavern, etc.).
  • Toughness A life at sea or on land has conditioned your body. You gain an additional hit point each level.
Subraces

There are two different subraces for the minotaur race. Both of these subraces have forsaken the sea for a more landlocked life. Subraces have all of the racial abilities as a normal minotaur. The listed benefits replace the standard benefit.

Mountain Nomad

This minotaur subrace are ones that have forsaken the sea and make their homes in the mountains. They are a hearty bunch that have taken to living in the mountains and caves. As a Mountain Nomad, you gain the following benefits:

  • Ability Score Increase Your Dexterity increases by 2, and your Wisdom increases by 1.
  • Nature’s Friend Choose one of the following to gain proficiency in: Perception, Survival and Nature. Additionally, you have advantage on Perception and Survival checks when made to find a safe path to travel or when tracking. Finally, you always know which way is true north and you can tell which general direction will lead to the nearest exit to a dungeon or cavern (north, south, east, west). This replaces the Goring Rush feature.
  • Speed Your base walking speed is 40 feet.
Plainstrider

This minotaur subrace are ones that have forsaken the sea and make their homes on the open plains. They live a nomadic or semi-nomadic lifestyle, moving from location to location that have an abundance of food and resources. Generally, Plainstriders have a set series of locations that they use. As a Plainstrider, you gain the following benefits:

  • Ability Score Increase Your Dexterity score increases by 2 and your Wisdom score increases by 1.
  • Longstrider Your base movement speed increases to 40 feet when in plains or flat land. This replaces the Goring Rush feature.
  • At Home On The Plains Choose one of the following to gain proficiency in: Perception, Survival, Nature. This replaces the Imposing Presence feature.
  • Sprinter You can use a Dash maneuver as a bonus action, rather than a full action.
Racial Feats Fury of the Sea

Prerequisite: Minotaur
Spending time out on the open ocean and seeing the rage and fury that she has to offer has left its mark on you. As an action, you can enter a ferocious rage while in combat. This state lasts for 1 minute or until you lose concentration. You may not cast spells while in a fury. You may use this ability once per long rest. While in this state, you gain the following benefits:

  • When you make a melee weapon attack using Strength, you add +2 to the damage dealt.
  • Your speed increases by 10 feet if you aren’t wearing heavy armor.
  • Attacks made against you are at a disadvantage. You may use this ability once per long rest.
Powerful Grip

Prerequisite: Minotaur
The sea has been a cruel bitch some times. You have the skills to wrestle the largest of creatures and hold steady when the sea rages. You gain the following benefits:

  • Your Strength score increases by 1. You can grapple creatures up to 2 size categories higher than you, but both hands need to be free.
Horns of Greatness

Prerequisite: Minotaur
The pride you have in your horns has gone to new heights. The meticulous care that you take in sharpening and adorning them has turned them into deadly, lacerating weapons. You gain the following benefits:

  • You can use your reaction to change the damage type that your horns do from piercing, slashing or bludgeoning. This change lasts for one round and can be used three times, which are renewed after a long rest.
Horns of Glory

Prerequisite: Minotaur
The pride you have in your horns has gone to new heights. As you grow in power, your horns become more glorious to behold. . You gain the following benefits:

  • Your Strength score increases by 1. Your horns deal 1d8 piercing damage, increasing to 1d10 at 8th level and 1d12 at 11th level.
Author’s Note

This version is a combination of the Minotaur race in the Unearthed Arcana and Guildmaster’s Guide to Ravinca versions, along with some original content.
“The Minotaur Playable Race is unofficial Fan Content permitted under the Fan Content Policy. Not approved/endorsed by Wizards. Portions of the materials used are property of Wizards of the Coast. ©Wizards of the Coast LLC.”

Tabaxi

Hailing from a strange and distant land, wandering tabaxi are catlike humanoids driven by curiosity to collect interesting artifacts, gather tales and stories, and lay eyes on all the world’s wonders. Ultimate travelers, the inquisitive tabaxi rarely stay in one place for long. Their innate nature pushes them to leave no secrets uncovered, no treasures or legends lost.

Wandering Outcasts

Most tabaxi remain in their distant homeland, content to dwell in small, tight clans. These tabaxi hunt for food, craft goods, and largely keep to themselves.
However, not all tabaxi are satisfied with such a life. The Cat Lord, the divine figure responsible for the creation of the tabaxi, gifts each of his children with one specific feline trait. Those tabaxi gifted with curiosity are compelled to wander far and wide. They seek out stories, artifacts, and lore. Those who survive this period of wanderlust return home in their elder years to share news of the outside world. In this manner, the tabaxi remain isolated but never ignorant of the world beyond their home.

Barters of Lore

Tabaxi treasure knowledge rather than material things. A chest filled with gold coins might be useful to buy food or a coil of rope, but it’s not intrinsically interesting. In the tabaxi’s eyes, gathering wealth is like packing rations for a long trip. It’s important to survive in the world, but not worth fussing over. Instead, tabaxi value knowledge and new experiences. Their ears perk up in a busy tavern, and they tease out stories with offers of food, drink, and coin. Tabaxi might walk away with empty purses, but they mull over the stories and rumors they collected like a miser counting coins.
Although material wealth holds little attraction for the tabaxi, they have an insatiable desire to find and inspect ancient relics, magical items, and other rare objects. Aside from the power such items might confer, a tabaxi takes great joy in unraveling the stories behind their creation and the history of their use.

Fleeting Fancies

Wandering tabaxi are mercurial creatures, trading one obsession or passion for the next as the whim strikes. A tabaxi’s desire burns bright, but once met it disappears to be replaced with a new obsession. Objects remain intriguing only as long as they still hold secrets. A tabaxi rogue could happily spend months plotting to steal a strange gem from a noble, only to trade it for passage on a ship or a week’s lodging after stealing it. The tabaxi might take extensive notes or memorize every facet of the gem before passing it on, but the gem holds no more allure once its secrets and nature have been laid bare.

Tinkers and Ministrels

Curiosity drives most of the tabaxi found outside their homeland, but not all of them become adventurers. Tabaxi who seek a safer path to satisfy their obsessions become wandering tinkers and minstrels.
These tabaxi work in small troupes, usually consisting of an elder, more experienced tabaxi who guides up to four young ones learning their way in the world. They travel in small, colorful wagons, moving from settlement to settlement. When they arrive, they set up a small stage in a public square where they sing, play instruments, tell stories, and offer exotic goods in trade for items that spark their interest. Tabaxi reluctantly accept gold, but they much prefer interesting objects or pieces of lore as payment.
These wanderers keep to civilized realms, preferring to bargain instead of pursuing more dangerous methods of sating their curiosity. However, they aren’t above a little discreet theft to get their claws on a particularly interesting item when an owner refuses to sell or trade it.
Tabaxi characters in the world of Imrallon use the same racial stats that is in Volo’s Guide to Monsters.

Tiefling

Tieflings have a family bloodline that is infernal in nature and are born to serve as champions of devilish desires. When the awakening occurs, their heritage comes through. The transformation from looking like humans to becoming true tieflings is an excruciatingly painful ordeal. When the transformation is complete, tieflings have large horns grow from their heads that take any of a variety of shapes. They have long thick tails that lash about or coil around their legs. Their canine teeth are sharply pointed, and their eyes turn solid colors—black, red, white, silver, or gold—with no visible sclera or pupil. Their skin tones cover the full range of human coloration, but develop various shades of red. Their hair, cascading down from behind their horns, is usually dark, from black or brown to dark red, blue, or purple.
Tiefling in Imrallon are members of the Beacon Races and have the same Racial stats that are in the Player’s Handbook

Triton

Tritons guard the ocean depths, building small settlements beside deep trenches, portals to the elemental planes, and other dangerous spots far from the eyes of land-bound folk. Long-established guardians of the deep ocean floor, in recent years the noble tritons have become increasingly active in the world above.

Aquatic Crusaders

Centuries ago, tritons entered the world in response to the growing threat of evil elementals. Tritons waged many wars against their enemies on the Plane of Water, driving them into the Darkened Depths where they escaped into the crushing pressure and utter darkness. In time, the tritons noticed that their ancient elemental foes had grown quiet. Expeditions to the depths revealed that krakens, sahuagin, and far worse foes had fled the Plane of Water for the Material Plane.
The tritons, driven by a sense of duty and responsibility, would not allow their foes to escape so easily.
A great conclave of tritons chose volunteers skilled in weapons and magic as part of an expeditionary force to enter the Material Plane and seek out their enemies. Those tritons spread across the world’s oceans and established protectorates to watch over deep sea trenches, portals, undersea caves, and other locations where their enemies might lurk. They defeated their foes when they found them and drove the rest into hiding.
With their foes banished to the deepest reaches of the sea, tritons settled in to watch for any sign of their return. Over time, the tritons extended their stewardship over the sea floor from their initial settlements and built outposts to create trade with other races. Despite this expansion, few folk know of them. Their settlements are so remote even merfolk and sea elves rarely encounter them.

Haughty Nobles

As a result of their isolation and limited understanding of the Material Plane, tritons can come across as haughty and arrogant. They see themselves as caretakers of the sea, and they expect other creatures to pay them deep respect, if not complete deference. This attitude might grate on others, but it arises from a seed of truth. Few know of the tritons’ great victories over dreadful undersea threats. The tritons make little allowance for such ignorance and are delighted to expound upon the great debt others owe them.
Tritons also have a tendency to emerge from their isolation under the assumption that other folk will welcome them as respected allies and mentors. Again, distance drives much of this attitude. The tritons’ limited view of the world leaves them ignorant of the kingdoms, wars, and other struggles of the surface world. Tritons readily see such concerns as minor events, a sideshow to the tritons’ role as the world’s true protectors.

Staunch Champions

Despite their off-putting manners, tritons are benevolent creatures at heart, convinced that other civilized races deserve their protection. Their attitude might grate, but when pirate fleets prowl the waves or a kraken awakens from its slumber, they are among the first to take up arms to protect others.
Tritons readily sacrifice themselves for the common good. They will fight and die for humans, merfolk, and other creatures without question. Their self-absorbed nature makes them overlook the history of other creatures, but they also endure a sense of guilt over allowing the evils of the Plane of Water to enter the Material Plane and threaten its inhabitants. The tritons believe they owe a debt of honor to the world, and they will fight and die to pay it.
At times their fervor and ignorance of the world can lead them astray. Tritons encountering other creatures for the first time can underestimate them, leaving the tritons vulnerable to deception. With their strong martial tradition, tritons can sometimes be too eager to leap into a fight.

Strangers to the Surface

Given their isolation, most tritons have never been to the surface world. They struggle with the idea that they can’t easily move up and down out of water, and the changing of the seasons mystifies them.
Tritons also find the variety of social institutions, kingdoms, and other customs bewildering. For all their proud culture, they remain innocent of the surface world. The typical triton protectorate is tightly regimented, organized, and unified around a common cause. A triton on the surface becomes easily confused by the bewildering array of alliances, rivalries, and petty grievances that prevent the surface folk from truly unifying.
At its worst, a triton’s arrogance compounds the tendency for the triton.not to understand the ways of the surface world. It’s easy for a triton to blame baffling social practices on what the triton perceives as the barbarism, weakness, or cowardice of surface folk.
Triton characters in the world of Imrallon use the same racial stats that is in Volo’s Guide to Monsters.

Vulpine

The Vulpine of the world of Imrallon are wily and believed to possess superior charisma, long life, and magical powers. The are at home both in the wilderness and in the city, but in both places, they tend to want the spotlight. Many kingdoms and powerful individuals employ vulpine as valued messengers, spies and thieves.

Born Of The Gods

Being born of both Aphrodite and Hermes, the vulpine embrace both the love and beauty from their mother and the mischief of their father. When you walk through town, you will likely see them as a beautiful woman or that of a vexatious child. In the wilderness, you will likely encounter a playful fox. Both would approach you with good intentions, but do delight in all sorts of harmless trickery and mischief. They are prone to getting caught up in the stories of adventurers and may even join them, whether or not they know it, to satisfy their inquisitive nature. Vulpine, in human form, resemble a beautiful and elegant humanoid with a long, fluffy fox tail. They tend to have a lean body and brightly colored hair. In fox form, they appear identical to a normal fox. The color of the fur on the fox is the same as their hair in human form. Many times, the eye color and other subtle features carry over between the two forms. They range in color from black and dark brown to a reddish-orange, pale-yellow, white, grey, or even silver. Vulpine that are in arctic regions, they tend to be pure white.

Natural Shapeshifters

Aphrodite and Hermes had a child that was conceived while they were both in fox form. This child was named Vulpine, which transferred to the name of the race. Vulpine can be born in either a humanoid form or a fox form. This is dependent on what form the child’s parents were in when it was conceived. If they were both in humanoid form, the child will be born a humanoid and vice versa. Vulpine will only mate when both are in the same form. When they come of age generally between 50 and 75 years old, they will be gifted with their other natural form. This comes spontaneously and generally during the night time hours.

Endearing Pranksters

Vulpine are extremely inquisitive and fascinated with the people of the world and their stories. This tends to have them find a natural fit with storytellers and loremasters. Some find that they are suited for the theft of this knowledge and make excellent thieves and spies. Regardless, Vulpine absolutely love to play pranks on others. These are rarely anything more than simple, harmless tricks. Otherwise, it may cause those around them to be less tolerant of them and cause them to be driven away.

Vulpine Names

Vulpine tend to take single names that are either Elven or Human, depending on where they lived. It’s not unheard of for a Vulpine to take on Dwarven or even Orc names.

  • Male Names: Titus, Marcus, Decius, Gianni, Alexios, Anlyth, Erendriel, Taeral
  • Female Names: Accia, Sulpicia, Cinnabar, Lucida, Nesterin, Pettwoode
Vulpine Religion

It is a near certainty that Vulpine would worship either Aphrodite or Hermes. They wear small trinkets to show this that stay in place for both their forms. Occasionally, you do find an individual that leaves this behind and seeks out other divine entities to worship.

Nomadic Clans

Vulpine are nomadic by nature and form clans that have multiple family units. Each clan has a set path that they move to and from as the resources renew. These paths are generational and stay with the clan. When disputes occur, the two clans meet to discuss the boundaries and, if the negotiations fail, war will break out.

Other Race Relations
  • Elves.The elves are fancy and have some great stories!
  • Dwarves.Arg! Dwarves are too humdrum and rigid to the point of boredom.
  • Humans.Humans are a curiosity. They have some great stories for the most part.
Vulpine Traits
  • Ability Score Increase Your Charisma score increases by 2, and your Dexterity score increases by 1.
  • Age Vulpine mature slowly, achieving adulthood at around 50 to 75 years and can live up to around 700 years
  • Alignment The mischievous nature and general good nature of Vulpine tend to have them lean towards Chaotic Good alignments, however, it is not unknown to find them following the strict rule of Law or finding delight in the deeds of Evil.
  • Size
    • Humanoid Form (Medium):Vulpine, in humanoid form, are about the same size as humans, running 5ft to 6ft in height and average about 100 to 160 lbs.
    • Fox Form (Tiny): When the Vulpine is in fox form, they are no larger or smaller than a normal fox.
  • Speed Your human form base walking speed is 30 feet and your fox form is 40 feet.
  • Darkvision Vulpine, being both humanoid and fox, can see in darkness as well as in light. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.
  • Vulpine Magic You know the dancing lights cantrip. Once you reach 3rd level, you can cast charm person once per long rest as a 2nd level spell. Once you reach 5th level, you can also cast invisibility on yourself once per long rest. You don’t need material components for these spells. Charisma is your spellcasting ability for these spells.
  • Shapeshift You can spend an action to transform between your fox and humanoid form at will. This ability functions as the druid’s Wild Shape class feature with the following exceptions:
    • You may speak as normal and use Vulpine Magic while in your fox form.
    • When you transform, you retain your existing hit points and damage instead of assuming the beast’s hit points.
  • Natural Diplomacy You have proficiency in one of the following skills of your choice: Insight or Persuasion.
  • Keen Senses Vulpine are known for a strong sense of smell and hearing. You gain advantage on perception checks that rely on a smell or sound.
  • Languages You speak, read, and write Common and Sylvan.
Subraces

The vulpine have subraces that are based on climate locations. Subraces have all of the racial abilities as a normal vulpine. The listed benefits replace the standard benefit.

Polar Fox

This vulpine subrace are ones that are found in arctic and tundra climates. They are colored from a very light silver to pure white fur. They tend to be slightly smaller than normal vulpine. As a Polar Fox, you gain the following benefits:

  • Ability Score Increase Your Wisdom increases by 2, and your Constitution increases by 1.
  • Snowborn You are born in the winter wasteland and acclimatized to the environment. You ignore penalties from the harshness of this environment. This replaces the Keen Senses feature.
Desert Fox

There are clans of vulpine that reside in the harsh desert environments of Imrallon. These ones have fur that is earth tones and also tend to be slightly smaller than normal vulpine. As a Desert Fox, you gain the following benefits:

  • Ability Score Increase Your Wisdom increases by 2, and your Constitution increases by 1.
  • Shifting Sands You are born, live and thrive in the desert and acclimatized to the environment. You ignore penalties from the harshness of this environment. This replaces the Kee

n Senses feature.

Racial Feats Lithe Agility

Prerequisite: Vulpine
You have trained your body to harness your innate magical abilities to great benefit.

  • You gain the ability to cast Longstrider and Jump once each per long rest. You also gain proficiency in your choice of either athletics or acrobatics.
Memory Recall

Prerequisite: Vulpine
You have an interesting knack for remembering the smallest of details. You gain the following benefits:

  • Increase your Intelligence or Wisdom score by 1.
  • You have an excellent memory, and can recall with precision most of the things you have seen and heard, including the text of a book that you casually flipped through, a large list of names that you perused, or the number of pronouns used in a speech that you heard. Especially small details may require an Intelligence check with the DC set by your GM.
Author’s Note

This version is a combination of the Vulpine race gathered and developed from previous editions, along with some original content.
The Vulpine Playable Race is unofficial Fan Content permitted under the Fan Content Policy. Not approved/endorsed by Wizards. Portions of the materials used are property of Wizards of the Coast. ©Wizards of the Coast LLC.

Other races would be subject to GM review and approval.

Class Selection

The following classes from the Player’s Handbook are allowed. Due to the nature of this world, spells deemed as “healing spells” are by the will of the Gods. See “Healing Special Rules” below for more details.

Artificer

Masters of unlocking magic in everyday objects, artificers are supreme inventors. They see magic as a complex system waiting to be decoded and controlled. Artificers use tools to channel arcane power, crafting temporary and permanent magical objects. Artificers first appeared in Imrallon when dwarven explorers found the vivlío dimiourgías, an ancient creation tome. The tome was said to be crafted by one of Hephaestus’s apprentices, Daedalus. The dwarves mastered its techniques and the knowledge leaked at some point. Now, although still relatively scarce, artificers are found across Imrallon. Even the Order of the Phoenix has recognized the practice.
You must have an Intelligence score of 13 or higher in order to multiclass in or out of this class.
1st2nd3rd4th5th

The Artificer Class Progression
Level Proficiency Bonus Features Infusions Known Infused Items Cantrips Known Spell Slots per Spell Level
1st +2 Magical Tinkering, Spellcasting 2 2
2nd +2 Infuse Item 3 2 2 2
3rd +2 Artificer Specialist, Tool Expertise 3 2 2 3
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement 4 2 2 3
5th +3 Arcane Armament 4 2 2 4 2
6th +3 Artificer Specialist feature 4 3 2 4 2
7th +3 5 3 2 4 3
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement 5 3 2 4 3
9th +4 5 3 2 4 3 2
10th +4 The Right Cantrip for the Job 5 3 3 4 3 2
11th +4 6 4 3 4 3 3
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement 6 4 3 4 3 3
13th +5 6 4 3 4 3 3 1
14th +5 Artificer Specialist feature 6 4 4 4 3 3 2
15th +5 7 4 4 4 3 3 2
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement 7 4 4 4 3 3 3 1
17th +6 7 4 4 4 3 3 3 1
18th +6 Spell-Storing Item 7 5 4 4 3 3 3 1
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement 8 4 4 4 3 3 3 2
20th +6 Soul of Artifice 8 4 4 4 3 3 3 2
Class Features

As an artificer, you gain the following class features.

Hit Points

Hit Dice: 1d8 per artificer level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 8 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d8 (or 5) + your Constitution modifier per artificer level after 1st

Proficiencies

Armor: Light armor, medium armor, shields
Weapons: Simple weapons, hand crossbows, heavy crossbows
Tools: Thieves’ tools, tinker’s tools, one type of artisan’s tools of your choice
Saving Throws: Constitution, Intelligence
Skills: Choose two from Arcana, History, Investigation, Medicine, Nature, Perception, Sleight of Hand

Equipment

You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:

  • any two simple weapons
  • a light crossbow and 20 bolts
  • (a) studded leather armor or (b) scale mail
  • thieves’ tools and a dungeoneer’s pack
Magical Tinkering

At 1st level, you learn how to invest a spark of magic in objects that would otherwise be mundane. To use this ability, you must have thieves’ tools, tinker’s tools, or other artisan’s tools in hand. You then touch a Tiny nonmagical object as an action and give it one of the following magical properties of your choice:

  • The object sheds bright light in a 5-foot radius and dim light for an additional 5 feet.
  • Whenever tapped by a creature, the object emits a recorded message that can be heard up to 10 feet away. You utter the message when you bestow this property on the object, and the recording can be no more than 6 seconds long.
  • The object continuously emits your choice of an odor or a nonverbal sound (wind, waves, chirping, or the like). The chosen phenomenon is perceivable up to 10 feet away.
  • A static visual effect appears on one of the object’s surfaces. This effect can be a picture, up to 25 words of text, lines and shapes, or a mixture of these elements, as you like.

The chosen property lasts indefinitely. As an action, you can touch the object and end the property early.
You can give the magic of this feature to multiple objects, touching one object each time you use the feature, and a single object can bear only one of the properties at a time. The maximum number of objects you can affect with the feature at one time is equal to your Intelligence modifier (minimum of one object). If you try to exceed your maximum, the oldest property immediately ends, and then the new property applies.

Spellcasting

You have studied the workings of magic, how to channel it through objects, and how to awaken it within them. As a result, you have gained a limited ability to cast spells. To observers, you don’t appear to be casting spells in a conventional way; you look as if you’re producing wonders through various items.

Tools Required

You produce your artificer spell effects through your tools. You must have a spellcasting focus, specifically thieves’ tools or some kind of artisan’s tool in hand when you cast any spell with this Spellcasting feature. You must be proficient with the tool to use it in this way.
After you gain the Infuse Item feature at 2nd level, you can also use any item bearing one of your infusions as a spellcasting focus.

Cantrips

At 1st level, you know two cantrips of your choice from the artificer spell list. At higher levels, you learn additional artificer cantrips of your choice, as shown in the Cantrips Known column of the Artificer table.
When you gain a level in this class, you can replace one of the artificer cantrips you know with another cantrip from the artificer spell list.

Spell Slots

The Artificer table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest.

Preparing and Casting Spells

The Artificer table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your artificer spells. To cast one of your artificer spells of 1st level or higher, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest.
You prepare the list of artificer spells that are available for you to cast, choosing from the artificer spell list. When you do so, choose a number of artificer spells equal to your Intelligence modifier + half your artificer level, rounded down (minimum of one spell). The spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots.
For example, if you are a 5th-level artificer, you have four 1st-level and two 2nd-level spell slots. With an Intelligence of 14, your list of prepared spells can include four spells of 1st or 2nd level, in any combination. If you prepare the 1st-level spell Cure Wounds, you can cast it using a 1st-level or a 2nd-level slot. Casting the spell doesn’t remove it from your list of prepared spells.
You can change your list of prepared spells when you finish a long rest. Preparing a new list of artificer spells requires time spent in tinkering with your spellcasting focuses: at least 1 minute per spell level for each spell on your list.

Spellcasting Ability

Intelligence is your spellcasting ability for your artificer spells; your understanding of the theory behind magic allows you to wield these spells with superior skill. You use your Intelligence whenever an artificer spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Intelligence modifier when setting the saving throw DC for an artificer spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.
Spell save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Intelligence modifier
Spell attack modifier = your proficiency bonus + your Intelligence modifier

Ritual Casting

You can cast an artificer spell as a ritual if that spell has the ritual tag and you have the spell prepared.

Infuse Item

At 2nd level, you gain the ability to imbue mundane items with certain magical infusions. The magic items you create with this feature are effectively prototypes of permanent items.

Infusions Known

When you gain this feature, pick two artificer infusions to learn. You learn additional infusions of your choice when you reach certain levels in this class, as shown in the Infusions Known column of the Artificer table.
Whenever you gain a level in this class, you can replace one of the artificer infusions you learned with a new one.

Infusing an Item

Whenever you finish a long rest, you can touch a nonmagical object and imbue it with one of your artificer infusions, turning it into a magic item. An infusion works on only certain kinds of objects, as specified in the infusion’s description. If the item requires attunement, you can attune yourself to it the instant you infuse the item, or you can forgo attunement so that someone else can attune to the item. If you decide to attune to the item later, you must do so using the normal process for attunement.
Your infusion remains in an item indefinitely, but when you die, the infusion vanishes after a number of days have passed equal to your Intelligence modifier (minimum of 1 day). The infusion also vanishes if you give up your knowledge of the infusion for another one.
You can infuse more than one nonmagical object at the end of a long rest; the maximum number of objects appears in the Infused Items column of the Artificer table. You must touch each of the objects, and each of your infusions can be in only one object at a time. If you try to exceed your maximum number of infusions, the oldest infusion immediately ends, and then the new infusion applies.

Artificer Specialization

At 3rd level, you choose the type of specialist you are:

Your choice grants you features at 3rd level and again at 6th and 14th level.

Tool Expertise

Starting at 3rd level, your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make that uses your proficiency with a tool.

Ability Score Improvement

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 18th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can’t increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

Arcane Armament

Starting at 5th level, you can attack twice, rather than once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn, but one of the attacks must be made with a magic weapon, the magic of which you use to propel the attack.

The Right Cantrip for the Job

At 10th level, you gain the ability to make sure you have the right magical tool for a job. Whenever you finish a short or long rest, you can replace one of the artificer cantrips you know with another cantrip from the artificer spell list.

Spell-Storing Item

When you reach 18th level, you learn how to store a spell in an object for repeated use. Whenever you finish a long rest, you can touch one simple or martial weapon or an item that you can use as a spellcasting focus and store a spell in it, choosing one 1st- or 2nd-level spell from the artificer spell list that requires 1 action to cast (you don’t need to have the spell prepared). With the object in hand, a creature can take an action to produce the spell’s effect from it, using your spellcasting ability modifier.
The spell stays in the object until it has been used a number of times equal to twice your Intelligence modifier (minimum of twice) or until you use this feature again.

Soul of Artifice

At 20th level, your understanding of magic items is unmatched, allowing you to mingle your soul with items linked to you. You can attune to up to six magic items at once. In addition, you gain a +1 bonus to all saving throws per magic item you are currently attuned to.
Source: Eberron-Rising from the Last War.

Artificer Spell List
Cantrips
  • Acid Splash
  • Dancing Lights
  • Fire Bolt
  • Guidance
  • Light
  • Mage Hand
  • Mending
  • Message
  • Poison Spray
  • Prestidigitation
  • Ray of Frost
  • Resistance
  • Shocking Grasp
  • Spare the Dying
  • Thorn Whip
1st Level
  • Alarm
  • Arcane Weapon
  • Cure Wounds
  • Detect Magic
  • Disguise Self
  • Expeditious Retreat
  • False Life
  • Grease
  • Identify
  • Jump
  • Longstrider
  • Sanctuary
  • Shield of Faith
2nd Level
  • Aid
  • Alter Self
  • Arcane Lock
  • Blur
  • Continual Flame
  • Darkvision
  • Enhance Ability
  • Enlarge/Reduce
  • Heat Metal
  • Invisibility
  • Lesser Restoration
  • Levitate
  • Magic Mouth
  • Magic Weapon
  • Protection from Poison
  • Rope Trick
  • See Invisibility
  • Spider Climb
3rd Level
  • Blink
  • Dispel Magic
  • Elemental Weapon
  • Fly
  • Gaseous Form
  • Glyph of Warding
  • Haste
  • Protection from Energy
  • Revivify
  • Water Breathing
  • Water Walk
4th Level
  • Arcane Eye
  • Fabricate
  • Freedom of Movement
  • Leomund’s Secret Chest
  • Mordenkainen’s Faithful Hound
  • Mordenkainen’s Private Sanctum
  • Otiluke’s Resilient Sphere
  • Stone Shape
  • Stoneskin
5th Level
  • Animate Objects
  • Bigby’s Hand
  • Creation
  • Greater Restoration
  • Wall of Stone

 

Barbarian

For some, their rage springs from a communion with fierce animal spirits. Others draw from a roiling reservoir of anger at a world full of pain. For every barbarian, rage is a power that fuels not just a battle frenzy but also uncanny reflexes, resilience, and feats of strength. Barbarians across Imrallon come from many, many different races and cultures, however, they all share the commonality that all of them are fierce warrior that are dedicated to their cause.
Barbarian characters use the same class features as the Player’s Handbook

Primal Paths

 

Bard

Humming as she traces her fingers over an ancient monument in a long-forgotten ruin, a half-elf in rugged leathers finds knowledge springing into her mind, conjured forth by the magic of her song—knowledge of the people who constructed the monument and the mythic saga it depicts.
A stern human warrior bangs his sword rhythmically against his scale mail, setting the tempo for his war chant and exhorting his companions to bravery and heroism. The magic of his song fortifies and emboldens them.
Laughing as she tunes her cittern, a gnome weaves her subtle magic over the assembled nobles, ensuring that her companions’ words will be well received.
Whether scholar, skald, or scoundrel, a bard weaves magic through words and music to inspire allies, demoralize foes, manipulate minds, create illusions, and even heal wounds. Bards across Imrallon travel and spread stories and songs of heroes new and old. They spread the deeds of the gods to the masses. The research newfound knowledge and document the exploits of explorers.
Bards of Imrallon use the same class features as the Player’s Handbook, however, to cast any cure spells, the bard needs to be dedicated to a deity that will provide this gift.

Bardic Colleges

 

Cleric

Arms and eyes upraised toward the sun and a prayer on his lips, an elf begins to glow with an inner light that spills out to heal his battle-worn companions.
Chanting a song of glory, a dwarf swings his axe in wide swaths to cut through the ranks of orcs arrayed against him, shouting praise to the gods with every foe’s fall.
Calling down a curse upon the forces of undeath, a human lifts her holy symbol as light pours from it to drive back the zombies crowding in on her companions.
Clerics are intermediaries between the mortal world and the distant planes of the gods. As varied as the gods they serve, clerics strive to embody the handiwork of their deities. No ordinary priest, a cleric is imbued with divine magic.
Clerics of Imrallon use the same class features as the Player’s Handbook and must devote themselves to one of the Imrallon deities.

Clerical Domains

 

Druid

Holding high a gnarled staff wreathed with holly, an elf summons the fury of the storm and calls down explosive bolts of lightning to smite the torch-carrying orcs who threaten her forest. Crouching out of sight on a high tree branch in the form of a leopard, a human peers out of the jungle at the strange construction of a temple of Evil Elemental Air, keeping a close eye on the cultists’ activities. Swinging a blade formed of pure fire, a half-elf charges into a mass of skeletal soldiers, sundering the unnatural magic that gives the foul creatures the mocking semblance of life. Whether calling on the elemental forces of nature or emulating the creatures of the animal world, druids are an embodiment of nature’s resilience, cunning, and fury. They claim no mastery over nature. Instead, they see themselves as extensions of nature’s indomitable will.
Druids of Imrallon use the same class features as in the Player’s Handbook.

Druid Circles

 

Fighter

A human in clanging plate armor holds her shield before her as she runs toward the massed goblins. An elf behind her, clad in studded leather armor, peppers the goblins with arrows loosed from his exquisite bow. The half-orc nearby shouts orders, helping the two combatants coordinate their assault to the best advantage. A dwarf in chain mail interposes his shield between the ogre’s club and his companion, knocking the deadly blow aside. His companion, a half-elf in scale armor, swings two scimitars in a blinding whirl as she circles the ogre, looking for a blind spot in its defenses. A gladiator fights for sport in an arena, a master with his trident and net, skilled at toppling foes and moving them around for the crowd’s delight—and his own tactical advantage. His opponent’s sword flares with blue light an instant before she sends lightning flashing forth to smite him. All of these heroes are fighters, perhaps the most diverse class of characters in the worlds of Dungeons & Dragons. Questing knights, conquering overlords, royal champions, elite foot soldiers, hardened mercenaries, and bandit kings—as fighters, they all share an unparalleled mastery with weapons and armor, and a thorough knowledge of the skills of combat. And they are well acquainted with death, both meting it out and staring it defiantly in the face. Fighters of Imrallon use the same class features as in the Player’s Handbook

Fighter Martial Archetypes

 

Magus

Eyes sparkling with wonder, a human wearing solid knight’s armor touches the glyphs adorning an ancient ruin’s wall, and he sheathes his longsword to record them into his spellbook. Singing the ancient warsong of her people, an elf lunges forward with her lightning-wreathed rapier to dispatch a looming hobgoblin with a strike as singular and definitive as thunder. Flipping up her hood with casual ease, a half-elf disappears behind a veil of magic, and conjuring a bow to her hands she pincushions a horde of dumbfounded bandits. Magi are the quintessential blend of arcane spellcasters and combat specialists. These clever sages seek perfection of body and mind through mastery of martial and mystic arts. They see no irony or juxtaposition in this combination; to them, supremacy in combat through magic is a single, unified pursuit.

Scholars of Sword and Spell

Many imagine that swords belong to dumb brutes, and that magic belongs to flimsy cowards, but there is philosophy hidden within the blade, and honor within the pursuit of the arcane. What warrior would deny himself a timely peal of thunder? What assassin would deny herself the timely cover of fog? Surely no ruin- exploring mage would deny himself a little extra fortitude and athleticism! Once one realizes that the difference between warrior and wizard is a mere convention, to merge these dissonant disciplines is a simple matter of practicality. As a warrior-mage, a magus inherits the wisdom both wizards and fighters share—control the battle. Magi train to be proactive, not reactive, and to plan for multiple scenarios of success. With just a handful of reliable stratagems, a magus will know whether it is time to lull her foes into mystical sleep, or to lay rest to an adversary with a decisive elemental strike.

Seekers of the True Way

The tradition of magi began in a meeting of East and West, a desert land of perpetual war and deep mysteries. The natives of the land, as a means of restoring peace, combined the martial and mystic traditions of the East and West. In remembrance, to this day magi across the world pursue the True Way—the mystical ideal of embodying all that is best in life, especially those aspects that seem opposite of one another. Magi seek the True Way as a means and an end of pushing themselves to the peak of perfection. This is to say that magi challenge themselves to grow, and they grow in order to face even greater challenges. In pursuit of the True Way, magi seek out challenges with worthy rewards and tests of caliber. For the ambitious and cunning magus, opportunities to discover hidden truths, forbidden secrets, and lost treasure sound like such worthy challenges. The True Way embodies more than the unity of East & West, sword & spell, risk & reward, and body & mind. Even with all of these factors, many aspects of mortal life remain unincorporated into this grand philosophy. As magi gain confidence in the True Way, they look toward other adventurers to learn the distinctive tricks of their trade. By learning these tricks, a magus advances his or her understanding of the True Way, and may share it with generations of magi to come.

Creating a Magus

As you create your magus character, consider his or her intellectual life. Besides pursuit of the True Way, perfection in all things, what ideals or schools of thought influence his or her outlook? Did your instructor of sword, magic, or philosophy instill in you the rigor required to achieve your dreams? Perhaps your obsession with perfection is almost religious in nature, and you wish to honor your tradition in your adventures? Or maybe, in spite of your incredible intellect, you do not think very deeply about such things, and the path of the magus is simply the clear choice for surviving and getting ahead in life.

Quick Build

You can build a magus very quickly using these instructions. Intelligence should be your highest ability score, followed second by either Strength or Dexterity. Choose Strength if you want to focus on melee weapons and armor, or Dexterity if you want to focus on ranged or finesse weapons. Next, choose a background. For your spells, choose the ray of frost and true strike cantrips, and for your spellbook choose burning hands, shield, and sleep.

The Magus
Level Proficiency Bonus Features Cantrips Known Spell Slots per Spell Level
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
1st +2 Spellcasting, Spell Combatant 2 2
2nd +2 Spellstrike, Fighting Style 2 3
3rd +2 Magus Path, Deflect Energy 2 4 2
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement 3 4 3
5th +3 Arcane Flourish 3 4 3 2
6th +3 Extra Attack, Path Feature 3 4 3 3
7th +3 4 3 3 1
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement 3 4 3 3 2
9th +4 Improved Arcane Flourish 3 4 3 3 3 1
10th +4 Arcane Syncretism 4 4 3 3 3 2
11th +4 4 3 3 3 2 1
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement 4 4 3 3 3 2 1
13th +5 4 3 3 3 2 1 1
14th +5 Arcane Syncretism, Path Feature 4 4 3 3 3 2 1 1
15th +5 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 1
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement 4 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 1
17th +6 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 1
18th +6 Arcane Syncretism 4 4 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 1 1 1
20th +6 Infinite Spellstrike 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 1 1
Class Features

As a magus, you gain the following class features.
Hit Points
Hit Dice: 1d8 per magus level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 8 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d8 (or 5) + your Constitution modifier per magus level after 1st
Proficiencies
Armor: Light armor, medium armor
Weapons: Simple weapons, martial melee weapons
Tools: None
Saving Throws: Strength, Intelligence
Skills: Choose two from Acrobatics, Athletics, Arcana, History, Insight, Intimidation, Investigation, Medicine, and Religion

Equipment

You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:

  • (a) a rapier, (b) a longsword, or (c) any simple weapon
  • (a) leather armor or (b) scale mail
  • (a) a short bow and a quiver with 20 arrows, (b) two hand axes, or (c) a long bow and a quiver with 20 arrows (if proficient)
  • (a) a scholar’s pack or (b) an explorer’s pack
  • A dagger, a component pouch, and a spellbook
Spellcasting

You have learned to strike with a blade in one hand, and reshape mana in its wake with the other. Just as your sword accompanies you in pursuit of knowledge, so too are your spells an indivisible aspect of your fighting style.

Cantrips

You know two cantrips of your choice from the magus spell list. You learn additional magus cantrips of your choice at higher levels, as shown in the Cantrips Known column of the Magus table.

Spellbook

At 1st level, you have a spellbook containing four 1st- level magus spells of your choice. Your spellbook is the repository of the magus spells you know, except your cantrips, which are fixed in your mind

Preparing and Casting Spells

The Magus table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest. You prepare the list of magus spells that are available for you to cast. To do so, choose a number of magus spells from your spellbook equal to your Intelligence modifier + your magus level (minimum of one spell). The spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots. For example, if you’re a 3rd-level magus, you have four 1st-level and two 2nd-level spell slots. With an Intelligence of 16, your list of prepared spells can include six spells of 1st or 2nd level, in any combination, chosen from your spellbook. If you prepare the 1st-level spell magic missile, you can cast it using a 1st-level or a 2nd-level slot. Casting the spell doesn’t remove it from your list of prepared spells. You can change your list of prepared spells when you finish a long rest. Preparing a new list of wizard spells requires time spent studying your spellbook and memorizing the incantations and gestures you must make to cast the spell: at least 1 minute per spell level for each spell on your list.

Spellcasting Ability

Intelligence is your spellcasting ability for your magus spells, since you learn your spells through dedicated study and apply them with cunning. You use your Intelligence whenever a spell references your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Intelligence modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a magus spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.
Spell save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Intelligence modifier
Spell attack modifier = your proficiency bonus + your Intelligence modifier

Ritual Casting

You can cast a magus spell you know as a ritual if that spell has the ritual tag and you have that spell in your spellbook.

Spellcasting Focus

You can use an arcane focus as a spellcasting focus for your magus spells.

Spellbook

Each time you gain a magus level, you can add one magus spells of your choice to your spellbook for free. Each of these spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots, as shown on the Magus table. On your adventures, you might find other spells that you can add to your spellbook (see the wizard’s “Your Spellbook” sidebar).

Spell Combatant

Your spellcraft is customized to fit the realities of the battlefield. You can perform the somatic components of spells even if you have a weapon or shield in one or both hands. Furthermore, you can mystically bond with a weapon by performing a special ritual while you hold the weapon. You perform the ritual over the course of 1 hour, which can be done during a short rest. Dropping or dismissing the weapon (no action required) shunts it into an extradimensional space, and you can use bonus action to draw it from this extradimensional space. You can’t affect an artifact or a sentient weapon in this way. The mystical bond breaks if you die, if you perform the 1-hour ritual on a different weapon, or if you use a 1- hour ritual to break the bond voluntarily. The weapon appears at your feet if it is in the extradimensional space when the bond breaks.

Spellstrike

Starting at 2nd level, when you hit a creature with a weapon attack, you can expend one spell slot to deal extra damage to the target, in addition to the weapon’s damage. The extra damage is 2d8 for a 1st-level spell slot, plus 1d8 for each spell level higher than 1st, to a maximum of 5d8. Its damage type is your choice from acid, cold, fire, or lightning. You can use this feature a number of times equal to your Intelligence modifier + half your Magus level (minimum of 1). You regain all your uses when you complete a long rest.

Fighting Style

At 2nd level, you adopt a particular style of fighting as your specialty. Choose one of the following options. The GM may offer you more Fighting Style options at his or her discretion. You can’t take a Fighting Style option more than once, even if you later get to choose again.

  • Archery. You gain a +2 bonus to attack rolls you make with ranged weapons.
  • Defense. While you are wearing armor, you gain a +1 bonus to AC.
  • Dueling. When you are wielding a melee weapon in one hand and no other weapons, you gain a +2 bonus to damage rolls with that weapon.
  • Great Weapon Fighting. When you roll a 1 or 2 on a damage die for an attack you make with a melee weapon that you are wielding with two hands, you can reroll the die and must use the new roll. The weapon must have the two-handed or versatile property for you to gain this benefit.
Magus Paths

At 3rd level, you delve into the advanced techniques of other disciplines and harmonize them with your own, which sets you on a distinct path toward the True Way. Choose a magus Path of your choice: the Path of Arcane Balance, Arcane Rage, the Celestial Herald, the Rune Knight, the Sand Dancer, or the Shadow Assassin. Each are detailed at the end of the class description. Your choice grants you features at 3rd level and again at 6th and 14th level.

Deflect Energy

At 3rd level, you can use your reaction to deflect or reflect magical energy when you take damage from a spell. When you do so, the damage you take is reduced by 1d10 + your Intelligence modifier + your magus level. If you reduce this damage to 0, choose to bounce the energy at an enemy. If you do, expend a spell slot and one creature you choose that you can see within 30 feet to make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed saving throw it takes 2d8 damage for a 1st-level spell slot, plus 1d8 for each spell level higher than 1st; it takes half as much on a successful saving throw. This damage is the same type as the damage you deflected.

Ability Score Improvement

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can’t increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

Arcane Flourish

Beginning when you reach 5th level, when you take the Cast a Spell action to cast a cantrip, you can make a weapon attack as a bonus action. At 9th level, this also applies to casting spells of 1st- level or higher.

Extra Attack

At 6th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn.

Arcane Syncretism

By 10th level, you have plundered magical knowledge from a wide spectrum of disciplines. Choose two spells from any class, including this one. A spell you choose must be of a level you can cast, as shown on the Magus table, or a cantrip. You learn any cantrips you select, and any spells of 1st-level or higher are added to your spellbook. You learn two additional spells from any class at 14th level and again at 18th level.

Infinite Spellstrike

At 20th level, there is no limit to how many times you can use Spellstrike. Furthermore. you regain all your 1st-level and 2nd-level spell slots whenever you roll initiative.

Magus Spells

These are the spells that a Magus can cast.

Cantrips (0 Level)
  • Acid Splash
  • Chill Touch
  • Dancing Lights
  • Light
  • Mage Hand
  • Mending
  • Prestidigitation
  • Produce Flame
  • Ray of Frost
  • Shellelagh
  • Shocking Grasp
  • True Strike
1st Level
  • Burning Hands
  • Color Spray
  • Comprehend Languages
  • Detect Magic
  • Expeditious Retreat
  • False Life
  • Feather Fall
  • Fog Cloud
  • Magic Missile
  • Shield
  • Silent Image
  • Sleep
  • Thunderwave
2nd Level
  • Barkskin
  • Blindness/Deafness
  • Blur
  • Darkness
  • Darkvision
  • Detect Thoughts
  • Enhance Ability
  • Enlarge/Reduce
  • Gust of Wind
  • Hold Person
  • Invisibility
  • Knock
  • Levitate
  • Mirror Image
  • Misty Step
  • Scorching Ray
  • See Invisibility
  • Shatter
  • Spider Climb
  • Suggestion
  • Web
3rd Level
  • Blink
  • Clairvoyance
  • Daylight
  • Dispel Magic
  • Fear
  • Fireball
  • Fly
  • Haste
  • Lightning Bolt
  • Major Image
  • Protection from Energy
  • Sleet Storm
  • Slow
  • Tongues
  • Water Breathing
  • Water Walk
4th Level
  • Banishment
  • Confusion
  • Dimension Door
  • Dominate Beast
  • Greater Invisibility
  • Ice Storm
  • Polymorph
  • Stoneskin
  • Wall of Fire
5th Level
  • Animate Objects
  • Cone of Cold
  • Creation
  • Dominate Person
  • Hold Monster
  • Insect Plague
  • Seeming
  • Telekinesis
  • Teleportation Circle
  • Wall of Stone
6th Level
  • Chain Lightning
  • Circle of Death
  • Disintegrate
  • Eyebite
  • Globe of Invulnerability
  • Heroes’ Feast
  • Mass Suggestion
  • Move Earth
  • Sunbeam
  • True Seeing
7th Level
  • Delayed Blast
  • Fireball
  • Etherealness
  • Finger of Death
  • Fire Storm
  • Plane Shift
  • Prismatic Spray
  • Reverse Gravity
  • Teleport
8th Level
  • Dominate Monster
  • Earthquake
  • Incendiary Cloud
  • Power Word Stun
  • Sunburst
9th Level
  • Gate
  • Meteor Swarm
  • Power Word Kill
  • Time Stop
  • Wish

 

Monk

Her fists a blur as they deflect an incoming hail of arrows, a half-elf springs over a barricade and throws herself into the massed ranks of hobgoblins on the other side. She whirls among them, knocking their blows aside and sending them reeling, until at last she stands alone. Taking a deep breath, a human covered in tattoos settles into a battle stance. As the first charging orcs reach him, he exhales and a blast of fire roars from his mouth, engulfing his foes. Moving with the silence of the night, a black-clad halfling steps into a shadow beneath an arch and emerges from another inky shadow on a balcony a stone’s throw away. She slides her blade free of its cloth-wrapped scabbard and peers through the open window at the tyrant prince, so vulnerable in the grip of sleep. Whatever their discipline, monks are united in their ability to magically harness the energy that flows in their bodies. Whether channeled as a striking display of combat prowess or a subtler focus of defensive ability and speed, this energy infuses all that a monk does.
Monks of Imrallon use the same class features as in the Player’s Handbook.

Monk Ways

 

Mystic

Kneeling over a fallen comrade, her eyes shut tight, a human woman draws from a hidden wellspring of power as her companion’s wounds begin to close. Speaking words unintelligible to mortal ears, she convinces a walking corpse to return back to the grave and resume his eternal sleep. Her body undulating back and forth to the rhythm of the drums, a tribal shaman raises wards to protect her tribe from the attacking barbarian horde. At the core of all living things is the touch of the divine, the residual energies of creation itself. Mystics have learned to tap into the spark of life residing within them and kindle it into a flame of power. The deities of Imrallon find the emergence of Mysticism as troubling. While the power they control will not rival those of deities priests and clergy, the fact that they draw from the divine without devoting themselves to the gods, is a threat.

Power of the Heart.

It is said that in order to understand the universe one must begin by understanding one’s self. Through meditation and careful introspection, mystics ponder the nature of truth and seek to unlock the mysteries of life. They ask themselves the difficult questions that most would rather keep unanswered. They become self-aware in a way few others are, uncovering and exploring the deep and buried recesses of their own souls. Through intense self-examination, mystics have discovered within themselves, at the very core of their being, an imprint left behind from the act of creation which they call the spark of life. By tapping into this spark, the mystic is able to coax it into a flame through which they are able to manifest powers previously only available through divine intervention. Mystics have no need to beseech the gods for their magic as do clerics or priests. Their power comes from a place of self-assurance and self-awareness. It allows them to affect the very energies of life and beyond. Mystics hail from all races, but most especially from cultures, regions and races.

Insightful and Strong.

Mystics are rare, extremely rare. They ask hard questions about life, death, the nature of existence, and our purpose for being with no fear of what the answer might be. Mystics seek truth and accept that truth for what it is. This search often leads mystics to a life of adventure. While they may not have the breadth of magic available to clerics, they are far more versatile making them highly valuable to any adventuring party, though their faith in themselves rather than in the gods can be off-putting to clerics and others that are devoted to the gods.

Creating a Mystic

When creating a mystic it is important to consider how your journey of self-discovery began. Perhaps you were trained as an aesthetic in the Library of Palanthas. Maybe you hail from a nomadic tribe whose exposure to harsh climates has forced them to accept hard truths. Or it could be that in the face of some tragedy you traveled into the wilderness to make sense of it all only to make your way to the Citadel of Light. Now that you have this power, what purpose does it serve? What will you do with it? It can be used to give life and hope to those lacking it. It can also be used to take both life and hope away.

Quick Build

You can create a mystic quickly by following these suggestions. First, Wisdom should be your highest ability score, followed by Constitution. Second, choose the hermit background.

Class Features

As a mystic you gain the following class features.

Hit Points

Hit Dice: 1d8 per mystic level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 8 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d8 (or 5) + your Constitution modifier per mystic level after 1st

Proficiencies

Armor: Light Armor, medium armor, shields
Weapons: All simple weapons
Tools: None
Saving Throws: Strength, Wisdom
Skills: Choose two from History, Insight, Investigation, Medicine, Nature, Persuasion

Equipment

You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:

  • (a) any simple weapon or (b) a shield
  • (a) hide armor or (b) studded leather armor
  • (a) a light crossbow and 20 bolts or (b) any simple weapon
  • (a) a scholar’s pack or (b) an explorer’s pack and a shield
Mystic Class Progression
Level Proficiency Bonus Features Cantrips Known Spells Known Mysticism Points Max Spell Level
1st +2 Spellcasting, Mystical Path 3 2 4 1st
2nd +2 Self-awareness, Turn Undead 3 3 6 1st
3rd +2 —- 3 4 14 2nd
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement 4 5 17 2nd
5th +3 —- 4 6 27 3rd
6th +3 Path Feature 4 7 32 3rd
7th +3 —- 4 8 38 4th
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement 4 9 44 4th
9th +4 Timeless Soul 4 10 57 5th
10th +4 Path Feature 5 11 64 5th
11th +4 —- 5 12 73 6th
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement 5 12 73 6th
13th +5 —- 5 13 83 7th
14th +5 Path Feature 5 13 83 7th
15th +5 —- 5 14 94 8th
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement 5 14 94 8th
17th +6 —- 5 15 107 9th
18th +6 Path Feature 5 15 114 9th
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement 5 15 123 9th
20th +6 Spark of Rejuvenation 5 15 133 9th
Spellcasting

For good or ill, you have learned to tap into the divine spark of life resident in all living beings. You are able to coax that spark into a flame of power that fuels your spells. See chapter 10 for the general rules of spellcasting.

Cantrips

At 1st level you know 3 cantrips of your choice from the mystic spell list. You may learn additional cantrips of your choice at higher levels, as shown in the Cantrips Known column of the Mystic table.

Mysticism Points

The Mystic table shows how many mysticism points you have to cast your spells of 1st level and higher. To cast a mystic spell, you must expend a number of mysticism points based upon the spell’s level as shown on the Mysticism Point Cost table. You regain all expended mysticism points when you complete a long rest.

Mysticism Point Cost
Spell Level Point Cost Spell Level Point Cost
1st 2 6th 9
2nd 3 7th 10
3rd 5 8th 11
4th 6 9th 13
5th 7
Casting Spells of 1st Level and Higher

The mystic table shows how many spell points you have to cast your spells. To cast a spell, you must expend a number of spell points based upon the spell’s level as shown on the Mysticism Point Cost table.
You know four mystic spells chosen from the Mystic spell list. The mystic table shows when you learn new spells as you gain levels. The spells you know must not exceed your maximum spell level as indicated on the Mystic table.
Also, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the mystic spells you know and exchange it for another from the Mystic spell list. The new spell must also not exceed the maximum spell level.

Spellcasting Ability

Wisdom is your spellcasting ability for your mystic spells, since the power of your magic comes from your self-awareness and introspection. You use Wisdom whenever a spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Wisdom modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a mystic spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.
Spell save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Wisdom modifier
Spell attack modifier = your proficiency bonus + your Wisdom modifier

Ritual Casting

You can cast a Mystic spell as a ritual if that spell has the ritual tag in the spell’s description.

Mystical Focus

You can use one mundane item of your choice (a feather, a lock of a loved one’s hair, a family heirloom, etc.) as a spellcasting focus for your mystic spells as described in Chapter 10 of the Player’s Handbook.

Mystical Paths

At 1st level, choose a mystical path, which describes which aspects of mysticism for which you have the greatest affinity. Mystical paths are detailed at the end of the class description and grant you special features at 1st level and again at 6th, 10th, 14th, and 18th level.

Path Spells

Each mystical path has a list of path spells that you gain at the mystic levels indicated in the path description. Once you gain a path spell, you always have it known, and it doesn’t count against the number of spells you know. If you have a path spell that doesn’t appear on the mystic spell list, the spell is nonetheless a mystic spell for you.

Self-Awareness

Starting at 2nd level, through self-reflection and meditation you have become particularly strong-willed and respected for your sensible advice. You double your proficiency bonus (if any) on Charisma (Persuasion) checks made against friendly or indifferent targets.

Mystical Surge

At 2nd level, you gain the ability to cause your inner divine spark to flare and surge forth, fueling magical effects. You begin with two such effects: Turn Undead and an effect determined by your mystic path. You learn additional effects through your mystical path as you gain levels. When you use your mystical surge, you choose which effect to create. You must then finish a short or long rest to use it again.
Some mystical surge effects require a saving throw. When you use choose such an effect, the DC of the save equals your spell save DC.
Beginning at 6th level you can use your mystical surge twice between rests, and at 18th level, you can use it three times in between rests. You regain all expended uses after completing a short or long rest.

Turn Undead

At 2nd level, you gain the ability to turn undead. As an action, you may turn any undead that can see or hear you within 30 feet. An undead creature must make a Wisdom saving throw. If it fails, it is turned for 1 minute or until it takes damage. A turned creature must spend its turns trying to move as far away from you as it can, and it can’t willingly move into a space within 30 feet of you. It also can’t take reactions. For its action, it can only take the Dash action or try to escape from an effect that prevents it from fleeing. If there’s nowhere for it to move it can take the dodge action.

Ability Score Improvement

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can’t increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

Timeless Soul

Beginning at 9th level, you age more slowly than others of your race. For every ten years that passes, your body only ages one.

Spark of Rejuvenation

At 20th level, you regain 5 mysticism points upon completing a short rest.

 

Paladin

Clad in plate armor that gleams in the sunlight despite the dust and grime of long travel, a human lays down her sword and shield and places her hands on a mortally wounded man. Divine radiance shines from her hands, the man’s wounds knit closed, and his eyes open wide with amazement. A dwarf crouches behind an outcrop, his black cloak making him nearly invisible in the night, and watches an orc war band celebrating its recent victory. Silently, he stalks into their midst and whispers an oath, and two orcs are dead before they even realize he is there. Silver hair shining in a shaft of light that seems to illuminate only him, an elf laughs with exultation. His spear flashes like his eyes as he jabs again and again at a twisted giant, until at last his light overcomes its hideous darkness. Whatever their origin and their mission, paladins are united by their oaths to stand against the forces of evil. Whether sworn before a god’s altar and the witness of a priest, in a sacred glade before nature spirits and fey beings, or in a moment of desperation and grief with the dead as the only witness, a paladin’s oath is a powerful bond. It is a source of power that turns a devout warrior into a blessed champion.
Paladins in Imrallon have the same Class Features as the Player’s Handbook.

Paladin Oaths

 

Ranger

Far from the bustle of cities and towns, past the hedges that shelter the most distant farms from the terrors of the wild, amid the dense-packed trees of trackless forests and across wide and empty plains, rangers keep their unending watch.
You must have a Dexterity score and a Wisdom score of 13 or higher in order to multiclass in or out of this class.

Class Features

As a ranger, you gain the following class features.

Hit Points

Hit Dice: 1d10 per ranger level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 10 + your Constitution modifier

Proficiencies

Armor: Light armor, medium armor, shields
Weapons: Simple weapons, martial weapons
Tools: None
Saving Throws: Strength, Dexterity
Skills: Choose three from Animal Handling, Athletics, Insight, Investigation, Nature, Perception, Stealth, and Survival

Equipment

You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:

  • (a) scale mail or (b) leather armor
  • (a) two shortswords or (b) two simple melee weapons
  • (a) a dungeoneer’s pack or (b) an explorer’s pack
  • A longbow and a quiver of 20 arrows
Ranger Class Progression
The Ranger Spell Slots per Spell Level
Level Proficiency Bonus Features Spells Known 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
1st +2 Favored Enemy, Natural Explorer
2nd +2 Fighting Style, Spellcasting 2 2
3rd +2 Primeval Awareness, Ranger Conclave 3 3
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement 3 3
5th +3 Ranger Conclave feature 4 4 2
6th +3 Greater Favored Enemy 4 4 2
7th +3 Ranger Conclave feature 5 4 3
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement, Fleet of Foot 5 4 3
9th +4 6 4 3 2
10th +4 Hide in Plain Sight 6 4 3 2
11th +4 Ranger Conclave feature 7 4 3 3
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement 7 4 3 3
13th +5 8 4 3 3 1
14th +5 Vanish 8 4 3 3 1
15th +5 Ranger Conclave feature 9 4 3 3 2
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement 9 4 3 3 2
17th +6 10 4 3 3 3 1
18th +6 Feral Senses 10 4 3 3 3 1
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement 11 4 3 3 3 2
20th +6 Foe Slayer 11 4 3 3 3 2
Favored Enemy

Beginning at 1st level, you have significant experience studying, tracking, hunting, and even talking to a certain type of enemy commonly encountered in the wilds.
Choose a type of favored enemy: beasts, fey, humanoids, monstrosities, or undead. You gain a +2 bonus to damage rolls with weapon attacks against creatures of the chosen type. Additionally, you have advantage on Wisdom (Survival) checks to track your favored enemies, as well as on Intelligence checks to recall information about them.
When you gain this feature, you also learn one language of your choice, typically one spoken by your favored enemy or creatures associated with it. However, you are free to pick any language you wish to learn.

Natural Explorer

You are a master of navigating the natural world, and you react with swift and decisive action when attacked. This grants you the following benefits:

  • You ignore difficult terrain.
  • You have advantage on initiative rolls.

On your first turn during combat, you have advantage on attack rolls against creatures that have not yet acted. In addition, you are skilled at navigating the wilderness. You gain the following benefits when traveling for an hour or more:

  • Difficult terrain doesn’t slow your group’s travel.
  • Your group can’t become lost except by magical means.
  • Even when you are engaged in another activity while traveling (such as foraging, navigating, or tracking), you remain alert to danger.
  • If you are traveling alone, you can move stealthily at a normal pace.
  • When you forage, you find twice as much food as you normally would.
  • While tracking other creatures, you also learn their exact number, their sizes, and how long ago they passed through the area.
Fighting Style

At 2nd level, you adopt a particular style of fighting as your specialty. Choose one of the following options. You can’t take a Fighting Style option more than once, even if you later get to choose again.

  • Archery — You gain a +2 bonus to attack rolls you make with ranged weapons.
  • Close Quarters Shooter — When making a ranged attack while you are within 5 feet of a hostile creature, you do not have disadvantage on the attack roll. Your ranged attacks ignore half cover and three-quarters cover against targets within 30 feet of you. You have a +1 bonus to attack rolls on ranged attacks.
  • Defense — While you are wearing armor, you gain a +1 bonus to AC.
  • Dueling — When you are wielding a melee weapon in one hand and no other weapons, you gain a +2 bonus to damage rolls with that weapon.
  • Mariner — As long as you not wearing heavy armor or using a shield, you have a swimming speed and a climbing speed equal to your normal speed, and you gain a +1 bonus to armor class.
  • Tunnel Fighter — As a bonus action, you can enter a defensive stance that lasts until the start of your next turn. While in your defensive stance, you can make opportunity attacks without using your reaction, and you can use your reaction to make a melee attack against a creature that moves more than 5 feet while within your reach.
  • Two-Weapon Fighting — When you engage in two-weapon fighting, you can add your ability modifier to the damage of the second attack.
Spellcasting

By the time you reach 2nd level, you have learned to use the magical essence of nature to cast spells, much as a druid does.

Spell Slots

The Ranger table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest. For example, if you know the 1st-level spell animal friendship and have a 1st-level and a 2nd-level spell slot available, you can cast animal friendship using either slot.

Spells Known of 1st Level and Higher

You know two 1st-level spells of your choice from the ranger spell list.
The Spells Known column of the Ranger table shows when you learn more ranger spells of your choice. Each of these spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots. For instance, when you reach 5th level in this class, you can learn one new spell of 1st or 2nd level.
Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the ranger spells you know and replace it with another spell from the ranger spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

Spellcasting Ability

Wisdom is your spellcasting ability for your ranger spells, since your magic draws on your attunement to nature. You use your Wisdom whenever a spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Wisdom modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a ranger spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.
Spell save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Wisdom modifier
Spell attack modifier = your proficiency bonus + your Wisdom modifier

Primeval Awareness

Beginning at 3rd level, your mastery of ranger lore allows you to establish a powerful link to beasts and to the land around you.
You have an innate ability to communicate with beasts, and they recognize you as a kindred spirit. Through sounds and gestures, you can communicate simple ideas to a beast as an action, and can read its basic mood and intent. You learn its emotional state, whether it is affected by magic of any sort, its short-term needs (such as food or safety), and actions you can take (if any) to persuade it to not attack.
You cannot use this ability against a creature that you have attacked within the past 10 minutes.
Additionally, you can attune your senses to determine if any of your favored enemies lurk nearby. By spending 1 uninterrupted minute in concentration (as if you were concentrating on a spell), you can sense whether any of your favored enemies are present within 5 miles of you. This feature reveals which of your favored enemies are present, their numbers, and the creatures’ general direction and distance (in miles) from you.
If there are multiple groups of your favored enemies within range, you learn this information for each group.

Ranger Conclave

At 3rd level, you choose to emulate the ideals and training of a ranger conclave. Your choice grants you features at 3rd level and again at 7th, 11th, and 15th level.

Ability Score Improvement

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can’t increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

Greater Favored Enemy

At 6th level, you are ready to hunt even deadlier game. Choose a type of greater favored enemy: aberrations, celestials, constructs, dragons, elementals, fiends, or giants. You gain all the benefits against this chosen enemy that you normally gain against your favored enemy, including an additional language. Your bonus to damage rolls against all your favored enemies increases to +4.
Additionally, you have advantage on saving throws against the spells and abilities used by a greater favored enemy.

Fleet of Foot

Beginning at 8th level, you can use the Dash action as a bonus action on your turn.

Hide in Plain Sight

Starting at 10th level, you can remain perfectly still for long periods of time to set up ambushes.
When you attempt to hide on your turn, you can opt to not move on that turn. If you avoid moving, creatures that attempt to detect you take a −10 penalty to their Wisdom (Perception) checks until the start of your next turn. You lose this benefit if you move or fall prone, either voluntarily or because of some external effect. You are still automatically detected if any effect or action causes you to no longer be hidden.
If you are still hidden on your next turn, you can continue to remain motionless and gain this benefit until you are detected.

Vanish

Starting at 14th level, you can use the Hide action as a bonus action on your turn. Also, you can’t be tracked by nonmagical means, unless you choose to leave a trail.

Feral Senses

At 18th level, you gain preternatural senses that help you fight creatures you can’t see. When you attack a creature you can’t see, your inability to see it doesn’t impose disadvantage on your attack rolls against it.
You are also aware of the location of any invisible creature within 30 feet of you, provided that the creature isn’t hidden from you and you aren’t blinded or deafened.

Foe Slayer

At 20th level, you become an unparalleled hunter of your enemies. Once on each of your turns, you can add your Wisdom modifier to the attack roll or the damage roll of an attack you make against one of your favored enemies. You can choose to use this feature before or after the roll, but before any effects of the roll are applied.

 

Rogue

Signaling for her companions to wait, a halfling creeps forward through the dungeon hall. She presses an ear to the door, then pulls out a set of tools and picks the lock in the blink of an eye. Then she disappears into the shadows as her fighter friend moves forward to kick the door open. A human lurks in the shadows of an alley while his accomplice prepares for her part in the ambush. When their target — a notorious slaver — passes the alleyway, the accomplice cries out, the slaver comes to investigate, and the assassin’s blade cuts his throat before he can make a sound. Suppressing a giggle, a gnome waggles her fingers and magically lifts the key ring from the guard’s belt. In a moment, the keys are in her hand, the cell door is open, and she and her companions are free to make their escape. Rogues rely on skill, stealth, and their foes’ vulnerabilities to get the upper hand in any situation. They have a knack for finding the solution to just about any problem, demonstrating a resourcefulness and versatility that is the cornerstone of any successful adventuring party.
Rogues of Imrallon use the same class features as in the Player’s Handbook.
Roguish Archetypes

 

Sorcerer

Golden eyes flashing, a human stretches out her hand and unleashes the dragonfire that burns in her veins. As an inferno rages around her foes, leathery wings spread from her back and she takes to the air. Long hair whipped by a conjured wind, a half-elf spreads his arms wide and throws his head back. Lifting him momentarily off the ground, a wave of magic surges up in him, through him, and out from him in a mighty blast of lightning. Crouching behind a stalagmite, a halfling points a finger at a charging troglodyte. A blast of fire springs from her finger to strike the creature. She ducks back behind the rock formation with a grin, unaware that her wild magic has turned her skin bright blue. Sorcerers carry a magical birthright conferred upon them by an exotic bloodline, some otherworldly influence, or exposure to unknown cosmic forces. One can’t study sorcery as one learns a language, any more than one can learn to live a legendary life. No one chooses sorcery; the power chooses the sorcerer.
Sorcerers of Imrallon use the same class features as in the Player’s Handbook.

Sorcerer Origins

 

Warlock

With a pseudodragon curled on his shoulder, a young elf in golden robes smiles warmly, weaving a magical charm into his honeyed words and bending the palace sentinel to his will. As flames spring to life in her hands, a wizened human whispers the secret name of her demonic patron, infusing her spell with fiendish magic. Shifting his gaze between a battered tome and the odd alignment of the stars overhead, a wild-eyed tiefling chants the mystic ritual that will open a doorway to a distant world. Warlocks are seekers of the knowledge that lies hidden in the fabric of the multiverse. Through pacts made with mysterious beings of supernatural power, warlocks unlock magical effects both subtle and spectacular. Drawing on the ancient knowledge of beings such as fey nobles, demons, devils, hags, and alien entities of the Far Realm, warlocks piece together arcane secrets to bolster their own power.
Warlocks of Imrallon use the same class features as in the Player’s Handbook.

Warlock Otherworldly Patrons

 

Witch

Three old crones stoop over a boiling cauldron filled with all manner of bizarre filth, churning and bubbling with a noxious fume. In the smoke and vapor above the pot, the trio can make out shapes and figures of great import, and one even cackles loudly at what she sees. A young girl sits underneath a tree, far from where the other children play. She glances about to make sure noone is watching, and snaps her fingers once to the empty air. After a moment of silence, a black cat appears around the tree’s bend and locks eyes with the girl, staring with a strange intelligence for a long moment. She gestures at one of the playing children, a heavy-set boy with a permanently affixed scowl; the cat understands. It wanders close to the boy, stretches its claws, and gets very low, ready to pounce for the boy’s eyes. A young elf intently mutters something underneath his breath each time he exhales. Visible only to him, a string of the foulest magic winds out from him and seizes a charging orc, which drops to its knees in agony. Witches are stricken by magic so dark it imprints a lasting shadow upon their essence. Through force of personality alone, they can spin this darkness outward, hexing creatures, casting manipulative spells, and even commanding a familiar with their thoughts.

Cursed

While others are blessed with magic, witches are cursed by it. Afflicted by some hateful arcana, whether accidentally or intentionally, witches are twisted inside and out by its daily tortures. With gruesome effort, they can warp this power into spells to wrack others with the same torture which plagues them.

Pariahs and Outcasts

Almost without exception, witches are feared and hated. They are victim to a number of misconceptions about them, usually relating them to hags and other evil creatures of the night which prey on innocent people. As a result, known witches are in great personal danger and can usually be found dwelling on the outskirts of civilization where townsfolk seldom tread. This does little to stop witch hunting and burnings, but provides some measure of safety from them. In reality, very few choose to become witches, and many of them can hide adeptly in society, using their magic to fill a number of roles, from seer to healer to apothecary. Being accused as a witch carries grave consequences, no matter the validity of the claim, so wise witches move frequently, never residing in one place for too long.

Familiar Masters

It is rare to find a witch without his or her constant companion, the familiar. Though familiars might be conjured by other spellcasters as well, a witch’s familiar with good reason is ubiquitous to common folk. Witches command intuitive magic, and have a deep link to their familiars. As a result, they can conjure more exotic familiars, and command them more swiftly than other spellcasters.

Creating a Witch

Creating a witch necessarily involves a powerful, malicious curse in your backstory. Who cast it? Did you take a curse upon yourself for power? Was your entire lineage cursed generations ago, leading to a bloodline of witches? Or did another spellcaster use sinister, forbidden magic to curse you for life? Decide on the nature of your witch’s curse and think about how you relate to it now. Do you feel like the curse was secretly a blessing, or does the desire for vengeance burn in your heart? What negative effects does the curse leverage on your personality and mind? Are you haunted by spirits, or is your mind plagued by destructive thoughts? How do you feel manipulating the power of this curse outwards into hexes and spells?

Quick Build

To build a witch quickly, make Charisma your highest ability score, followed by Constitution. Then, choose the chill touch and minor illusion cantrips, and the spells bane, hellish rebuke, hideous laughter, and thunderwave. Lastly choose the Hideous Witch’s Curse, and the hexes Evil Eye and Misfortune.

Class Features

As a witch, you gain the following class features.
Hit Points
Hit Dice: 1d8 per witch level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 8 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d8 (or 5) + your Constitution modifier per witch level after 1st
Proficiencies
Armor: Light armor
Weapons: Simple weapons, blowguns, shortswords, and whips
Tools: Alchemist supplies, poisoner’s kit
Saving Throws: Charisma, Wisdom
Skills: Choose two from Arcana, Deception, Insight, Intimidation, Persuasion, Nature, and Religion.

The Witch Class Progression
Level Proficiency Bonus Features Hexes Known Cantrips Known Spells Known Spell Slots
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
1st +2 Spellcasting, Witch’s Curse, Hexes 2 2 4 2 ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
2nd +2 Cackle, Familiar 3 2 5 3 ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
3rd +2 Witch’s Craft 3 2 5 4 2 ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement 3 3 6 4 3 ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
5th +3 Insidious Spell 4 3 6 4 3 2 ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
6th +3 Craft Feature 4 3 7 4 3 3 ─── ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
7th +3 Improved Familiar 4 3 7 4 3 3 1 ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement 4 3 8 4 3 3 2 ─── ─── ─── ─── ───
9th +4 Cauldron 5 3 8 4 3 3 3 1 ─── ─── ─── ───
10th +4 Craft Feature 5 4 9 4 3 3 3 2 ─── ─── ─── ───
11th +4 Grand Hex 5 4 10 4 3 3 3 2 1 ─── ─── ───
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement 5 4 10 4 3 3 3 2 1 ─── ─── ───
13th +5 Cauldron Improvement 6 4 11 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 ─── ───
14th +5 Craft Feature 6 4 11 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 ─── ───
15th +5 Grand Hex 6 4 12 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 ───
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement 6 4 12 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 ───
17th +6 ─── 7 4 13 4 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 1
18th +6 Grand Hex 7 4 13 4 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement 7 4 14 4 3 3 3 3 2 1 1 1
20th +6 Hexmaster 7 4 14 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 1 1
Equipment

You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted to you by your background:

  • (a) a whip and blowgun, (b) a light crossbow and 20 bolts or, (c) any simple weapon
  • (a) a component pouch or (b) a totem<
  • (a) a scholar’s pack or (b) a dungeoneer’s pack
  • Leather armor, any simple weapon, and a dagger
Spellcasting

You have learned to mold and reshape the magic that curses you into spells.

Cantrips

You know two cantrips of your choice from the witch spell list. You learn additional witch cantrips of your choice at higher levels, as shown in the Cantrips Known column of the Witch table.

Spell Slots

The Witch table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest.
For example, if you know the 1st-level spell bane and have a 1st-level and a 2nd-level spell slot available, you can cast bane using either slot.

Spells Known of 1st Level or Higher

You know four 1st-level spells of your choice from the witch spell list. The Spells Known column of the Witch table shows when you learn more witch spells of your choice.
Each of these spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots, as shown on the table. For instance, when you reach 3rd level in this class, you can learn one new spell of 1st or 2nd level. Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the witch spells you know and replace it with another spell from the witch spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

Spellcasting Ability

Charisma is your spellcasting ability for your witch spells. Your magic originates deep within yourself, where your insidious curse stirs restlessly. You use your Charisma whenever a spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Charisma modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a witch spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.
Spell save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier
Spell attack modifier = your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier

Ritual Casting

You can cast any witch spell you know as a ritual if that spell has the ritual tag.

Spellcasting Focus

You can use an arcane focus as a spellcasting focus for your witch spells.

Witch’s Curse

You are wracked by a terrible curse which infects your body and soul. At 1st level, choose the form that this curse takes from the options below.
Burned. Almost all of your body has been scorched by arcane flames, leaving you with striking black scars and embers of magic that burn under the skin. As a result, you have resistance to fire damage, and you know the cantrip produce flamei>, which does not count against your total number of cantrips known.
Feral. Through your curse, you have forgotten the manners and customs of civilized men and gone to live among beasts in the wild. Hunting and fighting daily, you have become savage. You have proficiency in the Nature skill. Also, whenever you take bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage from a nonmagical weapon, you can reduce the damage taken by 1. At 7th level, you can reduce this damage by 2, and at 15th level, you can reduce this damage by 3.
Hideous. Your appearance is ghastly to behold. You have proficiency with the Intimidation skill. When you roll initiative, you can choose one humanoid you can see to scare. That creature must make a Wisdom saving throw or be frightened until the end of your next turn.
Hollow. Your soul has been divorced from your body, trapping you in a limbo between life and death. When you or your familiar reduce a hostile creature to 0 hit points, you drain some of its life force, and gain temporary hit points equal to your witch level + Charisma modifier (minimum of 1).
Infested. You are constantly followed by vermin, like insects and rats, which crawl on your skin and swarm in your wake. As a result, you are immune to the biting of gnawing of tiny things; you take no damage from the bite attacks of tiny creatures or swarms of tiny creatures. Additionally, you can command these pests as your own. Starting at 2nd level, once per day when you summon your familiar, you can choose a swarm of rats as its form. Starting at 5th level, you can choose a swarm of insects.
Loveless. You are cursed to never find true love. Jaded and disaffected, not even magic can turn your heart; as a result, you are immune to being charmed.
Possessed. Your soul is occupied by a foreign spirit that sometimes tries to wrest away your consciousness. However, while you sleep, the spirit whispers magical secrets to you. You learn an additional witch spell at a level for which you have spell slots at 1st level, and again at 4th level, 8th level, and 12th level. These spells do not count against your total number of spells known.
Starving. No matter how much you eat, food turns to ash in your mouth. Your curse nourishes you, nonetheless, but only at the edge of starvation, and you are constantly wracked by pangs of hunger as a result. You don’t need to eat or drink, and don’t suffer levels of exhaustion from starvation or dehydration. Additionally, you are immune to being poisoned.
Visions. You are cursed to have terrible visions of the future, presaging the death of your friends, family, and yourself. However many of these visions are cruel deceptions, they are sometimes grimly accurate. You can add your Charisma modifier to your initiative rolls.

Hexes

You can learn a number of powerful incantations, known as Hexes, derived from the same insidious magic which cursed you.
At 1st level, you gain two hexes of your choice. Your hex options are detailed at the end of the class description. When you gain certain witch levels, you gain additional hexes of your choice, as shown in the Hexes Known column of the Witch table. Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the hexes you know and replace it with another hex that you could learn at that level. Unless otherwise noted, you can only have one hex active at a time and you concentrate on this hex like a spell. You can concentrate on a hex and a spell at the same time, and you make only one check to maintain your concentration on both.

Hexes

The Hexes below are presented in alphabetical order. Unless otherwise stated, if a hex calls for an attack roll or saving throw, it uses your spell attack bonus or spell save DC. All hexes require verbal or somatic components (caster’s choice at the time of casting.)

Abate

You can use your action to temper those around you. Creatures you choose within 30 feet cannot take reactions. This effect lasts until the end of your next turn.

Apathy

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, until the end of your next turn, the creature becomes indifferent toward one creature of your choice that it is hostile towards. This indifference ends if the target is attacked or harmed by a spell or if it witnesses any of its friends being harmed. When the hex ends, the creature becomes hostile again, unless the GM rules otherwise.

Beckon Familiar

You can cast the find familiar spell as an action without expending a spell slot or spell components. You must have the Familiar feature to choose this hex.

Bleeding

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a
Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, each time this creature takes damage, it takes an additional 1d4 damage. This effect lasts until the end of your next turn.

Charm

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, the creature is charmed by you until the end of your next turn. When the hex ends, the creature knows it was charmed.

Cripple

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, the creature can move a maximum of 10 feet or half its movement speed on its turn, whichever is lower, until the end of your next turn.

Dire Familiar

As an action, you can bolster your summoned familiar. For 1 minute, your familiar’s current and maximum hit points is increased by your witch level and it gains a bonus to its damage rolls equal to your Charisma modifier. You can cast other hexes while this hex is in effect. Once you cast this hex, you can’t cast it again until your familiar is dismissed, or until its duration expires.
You must have the Familiar feature to choose this hex.

Discord

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, the creature must use its action before moving to make a melee weapon attack a creature that you choose. If no creatures are within its reach, the creature acts normally. This effect lasts until the end of your next turn.

Disorient

As an action, choose one creature that you can see within 60 feet to make a Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, whenever this target makes an attack roll before the end of your next turn, it must roll a d6 and subtract the number rolled from the attack roll.

Doomward

As an action, choose one friendly creature other than yourself you can see within 60 feet. If this creature drops to 0 hit points before the end of your next turn and doesn’t die outright, it drops to 1 hit point instead. This hex then ends and can’t be used to target the same creature until you finish a short or long rest.

Duplicity

As an action, you can create a duplicate self, composed of shadowstuff, to confuse your enemies. When a creature attacks you, roll any die. On an odd number, the attack roll misses. This effect lasts until the end of your next turn or until you attack or cast a spell.

Evil Eye

As an action, choose one creature you can see that can see you within 60 feet to make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, the creature is frightened of you until the end of your next turn.

Face Swap

As a bonus action, you can mark a Large or smaller beast or a willing humanoid you can see within 60 feet with a special sigil. This sigil lasts for 1 hour, or until you mark another creature.
You can then use your action to trade faces with your familiar or the marked creature, gaining a limited amount of control over it. For the next minute, or until the target dies or you choose to end this hex on your turn (no action required), you are deaf and blind with regard to your own senses, and you cannot move, as your own body has a foreign face. During that time, your face replaces that of the target, and you can see through the target’s eyes, hear what it hears, and speak to those nearby. You gain none of the target’s special senses. You can also control where the target moves.

Finagle

As an action, you can invisibly manipulate objects within 60 feet of you, causing one of the following effects:

  • Push each object within 5 feet of you weighing less than 100 pounds up to 10 feet away from you.
  • Instantaneously cause an unlocked door or window to fly open or slam shut.
  • Break one small nonmagical object with fewer than 10 hit points that can fit within a 1-foot cube.
  • Lift and throw an object weighing less than 100 pounds that isn’t being worn or carried up to 60 feet in a straight line. Whenever you do so, you can make a spell attack roll against one creature you can see within range. The object and the target both take 1d10 + your Charisma modifier bludgeoning damage.
Fortune

As an action, choose one friendly creature other than yourself you can see within 60 feet. The creature has advantage on saving throws until the end of your next turn.

Go Unseen

As an action, you and your familiar become invisible. The effect ends at the end of your next turn, or if you or your familiar attack or cast a spell.
Once you cast this hex, you can’t cast it again for 1 minute.

Hesitate

As an action, choose one creature you can see that can see you within 60 feet to make a Wisdom saving throw. On its turn, the target can move or use an action to make an attack, but not both. This effect lasts until the end of your next turn.

Knowing

As an action, you open your third eye and become intuitively aware of your surroundings. You have advantage on Wisdom (Insight) rolls until the beginning of your next turn. Additionally, choose of the following pieces of information:

  • If a creature can speak a language
  • If a creature is at or below half its maximum hit points
  • What a creature’s highest ability score is You learn that piece of information for each creature within 30 feet. You can only learn one of these things about a creature, even if you cast this hex more than once.
Mind’s Eye

Your spiritual third eye heightens your vision to greater dimension. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray. You can also see through fog, mists, and similar obscurements without penalty. If you already have darkvision, its range increases by 60 feet. Additionally, you have a +2 bonus to your passive Wisdom (Perception) score.
This hex is always active and you can cast other hexes while it is in effect.

Mire

As an action, you can transform the ground within 30 feet of where you cast this hex into murky swamp, which is difficult terrain. You can move without penalty in this area.
This effect lasts until the end of your next turn.

Misfortune

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, whenever this target makes an ability check or a saving throw before the end of your next turn, it must roll a d6 and subtract the number rolled from the ability check or saving throw.

Nails

You grow unnaturally long and sharp fingernails. Your unarmed strikes deal 1d6 slashing damage and count as magical for the purpose of overcoming resistance and immunity to nonmagical attacks and damage. You can use Dexterity instead of Strength for the attack and damage rolls of your unarmed strikes.
Starting at 5th level, once per turn when you hit a target with an unarmed strike, you can deal an additional 1d6 necrotic damage to that target. At 11th level, this bonus damage improves to 2d6 and at 17th level, this damage increases to 3d6.
This hex is always active and you can cast other hexes while it is in effect.

Obfuscate

As an action, you create a 20-foot-radius sphere of fog centered on yourself. The sphere spreads around corners, and its area is heavily obscured. This effect lasts until the end of your next turn or until a wind of moderate or greater speed (at least 10 miles per hour) disperses it.

Peacebond

As an action, you can lock weapons to their owners. The weapons and ammunition of each creature within 30 feet become locked in their sheaths, quivers, or holsters until the end of your next turn. During this time, a creature can use its action to free its weapon with a Strength check, opposed by your Spell save DC.

Pestilence

As an action, you create a 5-foot radius cloud of toxic gas around you. Each creature other than you and your familiar that enters this area or begins its turn there must make a Constitution saving throw or be poisoned until the end of your next turn. This cloud follows you as you move, and disperses at the end of your next turn.

Prehensile Hair

You grow unduly long and tough hair (even from your eyebrows) which you can manipulate at will. You can use your hair to perform simple tasks within 10 feet of you, such as manipulating an object, opening an unlocked door or container, stowing or retrieving an item from an open container, or pouring the contents out of a vial. You can cast spells with a range of Touch using your hair, out to a range of 10 feet.
This hex is always active and you can cast other hexes while it is in effect

Ruin

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, the creature’s AC decreases by 4, to a minimum of 10, until the end of your next turn.

Scurry

As an action, a nonmagical object you choose within 30 feet sprouts legs and runs away. You can’t target an object that weighs more than 10 pounds, nor can you target one that is being worn as clothing or armor; however, you can target certain objects that are being carried, as long as they are not affixed entirely around a creature’s body and are not being held in a hand. For example, you can’t target a creature’s helmet or a sword it is wielding, but you can target a drawstring pouch it is wearing or a dagger that is sheathed at its side.
The object animates, wriggles free of its owner, if it has one, sprouts two legs, and moves 20 feet in a direction you choose. At the beginning of your turn, you can choose which direction the object moves. The object has an AC of 10, if its AC was not already higher, and remains animated until the end of your next turn, or until it is picked up.

Shriek

As an action, you release an ear-piercing wail. Each creature within 15 feet of you must make a Charisma saving throw or be deafened until the end of your next turn. Creatures that can’t hear you are immune to this effect.

Slumber

As an action, choose one creature you can see within 60 feet to make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, the target falls unconscious until it takes damage, or until the end of your next turn. Undead, creatures which are immune to being charmed, and creatures whose current hit points are greater than five times your witch level are immune to this effect.

Telepathy

You can communicate telepathically with any creature you can see within 60 feet of you. You don’t need to share a language with the creature for it to understand your telepathic utterances, but the creature must be able to understand at least one language.
This hex is always active and you can cast other hexes while it is in effect.

Tremors

As an action, you can create a small quake. Each creature on the ground within 10 feet of you must make a Dexterity saving throw or be knocked prone.

Ward

As an action, choose 1 creature you can see other than yourself within 60 feet. This creature has resistance to bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing damage from nonmagical weapons until the end of your next turn.

Cackle

At 2nd level, you can use your bonus action to cackle. The duration of all your hexes within 60 feet extends by 1 round. Not all witches laugh maniacally when they cackle, but all cackles require a verbal component, as a spell. These range from mundane curses and insults, to the murmuring of dead languages and speaking backwards.

Familiar

At 2nd level, you learn the find familiar spell and can cast it as a ritual without material components. The spell doesn’t count against your number of spells known. Additionally, once per turn as an action or a bonus action, you can allow your familiar to use its reaction to make one attack or cast a spell. When your familiar makes an attack, it uses your spell attack bonus instead of its own attack bonus on attack rolls, and deals damage equal to your proficiency bonus, if it would otherwise deal less. You also add twice your witch level to your familiar’s maximum hit points.

Witch’s Craft

Your knowledge of magic has culminated in learning a Craft, an innate variety of magic which exists apart from the schools of magic. When you reach 3rd level, choose one Witch’s Craft. Your choice grants you features at 3rd level, and again at 6th, 10th, and 14th level.

Craft Spells

Each craft is associated with a branch of arcana, represented by a number of spells which you learn. The levels of these spells are noted in the craft description. These spells count as witch spells for you and don’t count against your total number of spells known.

Insidious Spell

Starting at 5th level, you can maximize the damage of a witch cantrip you cast that only damages a single creature that is sole target of your hex.

Improved Familiar

At 7th level, you can cast a spell with range Self on your familiar as if your familiar had cast the spell itself. Your familiar concentrates on this spell for its duration.
Additionally, you can choose the following forms for you familiar: brass dragon wyrmling (without breath weapons), grep, imp, quasit, or spook.

Cauldron

At 9th level, you can brew potions in a bubbling cauldron using raw components scavenged from nature. Once per day during a short rest, you can expend a number of spell slots to brew up to 3 potions. These potions must have a total cost no greater than the total number of spell slot levels expended.
You can brew potions of animal friendship, healing, and poison for 1 spell slot level each. At 13th level, you can brew potions of heroism and mind reading, and philters of love for 2 spell slot levels each. The potions retain potency 24 hours, after which they become inert.

Grand Hex

By 11th level, you have perfected deeply malevolent forms of magic. You learn one Grand Hex, and you learn another at 15th and 18th level. Grand hexes are detailed at the end of the class description.

Grand Hexes

The Grand Hexes below are presented in alphabetical order. Unless otherwise stated, if a grand hex calls for an attack roll or saving throw, it uses your spell attack bonus or spell save DC.

Black Finger

When a single creature is the target of one of your hexes, one of its fingers turns black, and its fate is corrupted. Whenever this creature rolls a 20 on a d20 roll, the roll instead becomes a 1.

Blood Cauldron

You can brew potions immediately following a long rest and whenever you take a short rest. When you do so, you can brew up to 5 potions.
In addition to your potion options, you can brew potions of climbing and growth and vials of basic poison for 1 spell slot level each, potions of clairvoyance, greater healing, and resistance for 2 spell slot levels each, and potions of gaseous form, invisibility, and speed for 3 spell slot levels each. The potions retain potency 24 hours, after which they become inert.

Coven

Through a dark bargain, you have become a member of a hag’s coven. You can enlist the help of one of your foul sisters, a green hag, by summoning her in a 1-minute long ritual. Doing so dismisses your familiar, and you cannot summon your familiar while your hag ally is summoned. In combat, the hag rolls its own initiative and acts on its own turn. On each of your turns, you can use a bonus action to mentally command the hag. You decide what action the hag will take and where it will move during its next turn, or you can issue a general command, such as to guard a particular chamber or corridor. The hag can choose to ignore this action if she sees fit. If you issue no commands, the hag acts and moves as she chooses. The hag is friendly to you and your allies.
At the end of one hour, or when the hag is reduced to zero hit points, it flees, instantly teleporting away. After performing the ritual to summon your hag ally, you must finish a long rest before you can do it again.

Dark Hex

Choose one hex you know. Creatures have disadvantage on saving throws made to resist this hex’s effects.

Dual Hex

When you cast a hex which targets one creature, you can target two creatures instead.

Forceful Personality

Your Charisma score increases by 3, to a maximum of 23. You gain proficiency in Intimidation and Persuasion, if you did not have it before. When you make a Charisma (Intimidation) or a Charisma (Persuasion) check, you can add twice your proficiency bonus to the roll.

Hybrid

As a bonus action, if your familiar is within 5 feet of you, you can meld with it, transforming into a magical hybrid and wearing your familiar as armor. For the next minute, you have temporary hit points equal to your familiar’s hit points and your AC equals 10 + your Dexterity modifier + your Charisma modifier. While transformed, you can use any actions your familiar possesses, you can add your Charisma modifier to damage rolls you make with melee weapons, and you can attack twice, instead of once, when you take the Attack action on your turn. However, you can’t cast hexes or spells of 1st level or higher, though you can concentrate on spells and hexes that you have already cast. This transformation lasts one minute, until you lose all your temporary hit points, or until you dismiss it as an action. When it ends, your familiar is dismissed, and you can’t summon it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Into a Toad

You learn the spells animate objects, flesh to stone, polymorph, and two other 5th level or lower transmutation spells of your choice. These spells don’t count against your total number of spells known. You can cast one of them without expending a spell slot. After doing so, you must complete a long rest before doing so again.

Possession

As an action, your body becomes immaterial, and your spirit dives into a Large or smaller creature you can see within 10 feet of you in an attempt to possess it. This target must make a Charisma saving throw. On a failed save, you disappear and the target becomes incapacitated and possessed; you gain control of its body but don’t deprive the target of its awareness. While possessing the creature, you can’t be targeted by any attack, spell, or other effect. You maintain your Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma ability scores, and your alignment, but otherwise use the creature’s statistics. You don’t gain access to the target’s knowledge, class features, or proficiencies. For the purposes of spells and effects which can end possession, such as the spell dispel evil and good, you are treated as an undead spirit and can be banished from the target, returning to your own body, which rematerializes within 5 feet of the body.
This possession lasts for 1 hour, or until the body drops to 0 hit points or you are forced out by a spell or other magical effect that ends possession. Once you use this hex, you can’t do so again until you finish a long rest.

Remote Hex

The range of your hexes double and you can target creatures within range of your hexes even if you cannot see the target, provided you have seen the target in the last minute and know that the target is within range.

Slow Death

As an action, choose 1 creature within your reach to make a Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, the creature takes 1 necrotic damage each hour for the next 100 days. The damage can only be healed by magical means. A remove curse spell ends this effect. You can cast other hexes while this hex is active, but casting this hex again ends its effect on its first target.

Weave of Fate

When you take a long rest, you can peer into the threads of fate and foresee paths the future might take. Roll 2d20s and record the numbers rolled. You can replace any attack roll, saving throw, or ability check made by you or a creature that you can see with one of these foretelling rolls. You must choose to do so before the roll, and you can replace a roll in this way only once per turn. Each foretelling roll can be used only once. When you finish a long rest, you lose any unused foretelling rolls.

Witch’s Broom

While wearing no armor and carrying no shield, you can enchant a mundane object ─ like a broom, cauldron, or rug to fly for you. You gain a flight speed equal to your base movement speed while holding this item.

Witch’s Hut

When you begin a long rest, you can summon a magical domicile for the night. This domicile is an enchanted hut with the properties of the tiny hut spell, but it also physically resembles a witch’s abode. While you are inside, only creatures you choose can approach the hut. If a creature you did not designate comes within 10 feet of the hut, it rises up on a pair of magical legs, becoming a huge animated object, as per the spell animate objects, and defends itself. The huts occupants are physically safe and undisturbed within. When your long rest is finished, or when the hut is reduced to 0 hit points, it vanishes, and all its occupants are deposited in its space.

Hexmaster

By 20th level, you have mastered your foul magic. Humanoid creatures have disadvantage on saving throws against your hexes.

Witch Spells

A witch’s magic is dark, rooted in the agony of a sinister curse. But darkness begets darkness, and a witch’s curse begets even greater curses.

Cantrips (0 Level)
  • Acid Splash
  • Chill Touch
  • Dancing Lights
  • Mage Hand
  • Message
  • Minor Illusion
  • Prestidigitation
  • Produce Flame
  • Resistance
  • Spare the Dying
  • True Strike
1st Level
  • Animal Friendship
  • Accursed Act
  • Bane
  • Charm Person
  • Comprehend Languages
  • Curse of Chains
  • Curse of Tomes
  • Detect Magic
  • Disguise Self
  • Expeditious Retreat
  • Faerie Fire
  • Flawed Reconstruction
  • Fog Cloud
  • Hellish Rebuke
  • Hideous Laughter
  • Hollowing Curse
  • Protection from Evil and
  • Good
  • Silent Image
  • Sleep
  • Thunderwave
  • Unseen Servant
2nd Level
  • Animal Messenger
  • Blindness/Deafness
  • Calm Emotions
  • Curse Ward
  • Darkness
  • Detect Thoughts
  • Enthrall
  • Hold Person
  • Intrusive Thought
  • Invisibility
  • Knock
  • Misty Step
  • Ray of Enfeeblement
  • Shatter
  • Suggestion
3rd Level
  • Bestow Curse
  • Clairvoyance
  • Curse of Blades
  • Dispel Magic
  • Fear
  • Hypnotic Pattern
  • Magic Circle
  • Major Image
  • Nondetection
  • Remove Curse
  • Ruby-Eye Curse
  • Sending
  • Slow
  • Speak with Dead
  • Speak with Plants
  • Stinking Cloud
  • Tongues
4th Level
  • Arcane Eye
  • Banishment
  • Black Tentacles
  • Compulsion
  • Confusion
  • Curse of Aging
  • Curse of Youth
  • Dimension Door
  • Greater Invisibility
  • Locate Creature
  • Phantasmal Killer
5th Level
  • Curse Weapon
  • Dispel Evil and Good
  • Dominate Person
  • Dream
  • Geas
  • Hold Monster
  • Insect Plague
  • Mislead
  • Modify Memory
  • Pharaoh’s Curse
  • Planar Binding
  • Scrying
  • Seeming
6th Level
  • Corruption Curse
  • Elemental Curse
  • Eyebite
  • Guards and Wards
  • Magic Jar
  • Mass Suggestion
  • Programmed Illusion
  • True Seeing
7th Level
  • Curse of Binding
  • Etherealness
  • Forcecage
  • Mirage Arcane
  • Project Image
  • Plane Shift
  • Sequester
  • Symbol
8th Level
  • Antipathy/Sympathy
  • Demiplane
  • Dominate Monster
  • Feeblemind
  • Glibness
  • Mind Blank
  • Power Word Stun
9th Level
  • Astral Projection
  • Foresight
  • Identity Curse
  • Imprisonment
  • Weird

 

Wizard

Clad in the silver robes that denote her station, an elf closes her eyes to shut out the distractions of the battlefield and begins her quiet chant. Fingers weaving in front of her, she completes her spell and launches a tiny bead of fire toward the enemy ranks, where it erupts into a conflagration that engulfs the soldiers. Checking and rechecking his work, a human scribes an intricate magic circle in chalk on the bare stone floor, then sprinkles powdered iron along every line and graceful curve. When the circle is complete, he drones a long incantation. A hole opens in space inside the circle, bringing a whiff of brimstone from the otherworldly plane beyond. Crouching on the floor in a dungeon intersection, a gnome tosses a handful of small bones inscribed with mystic symbols, muttering a few words of power over them. Closing his eyes to see the visions more clearly, he nods slowly, then opens his eyes and points down the passage to his left. Wizards are supreme magic-users, defined and united as a class by the spells they cast. Drawing on the subtle weave of magic that permeates the cosmos, wizards cast spells of explosive fire, arcing lightning, subtle deception, and brute-force mind control. Their magic conjures monsters from other planes of existence, glimpses the future, or turns slain foes into zombies. Their mightiest spells change one substance into another, call meteors down from the sky, or open portals to other worlds.
Wizards of Imrallon use the same class features as in the Player’s Handbook.

Wizard Arcane Traditions

Other Unearthed Arcana or homebrewed classes are subject to GM approval.

Alignment
  • Any alignment is allowed, however, ‘Chaotic Stupid‘ will not be tolerated and actions will have consequences.
Traits, Ideals, Bonds and Flaws

Starting characters will follow the standard rules with creation or you can pick them. Your character backstories and Questionnaire needs to describe the circumstances where the Trait, Ideal, Bonds and Flaws came to be.

Character Backgrounds

The following backgrounds are available for all characters in the world of Imrallon. For any substitutions or changes, please discuss it with your GM.

Equipment

Starting characters will be starting off at 1st level and granted the funds based on their starting class, as shown below.

Character Class Starting Funds
Character Class Starting Funds
Artificer 5d4 x 10 den
Barbarian 2d4 x 10 den
Bard 5d4 x 10 den
Cleric 5d4 x 10 den
Druid 2d4 x 10 den
Fighter 5d4 x 10 den
Monk 5d4 x 10 den
Oracle 2d4 x 10 den
Magus 5d4 x 10 den
Mystic 4d4 x 10 den
Paladin 5d4 x 10 den
Ranger 5d4 x 10 den
Rogue 4d4 x 10 den
Sorcerer 3d4 x 10 den
Warlock 4d4 x 10 den
Witch 4d4 x 10 den
Wizard 4d4 x 10 den

Character’s are allowed one trinket, but this trinket must be of significant importance to the character and detailed within the backstory.

  • Firearms and Explosives are not allowed.
Character Deaths

If, or when, a character dies during the course of a campaign and a new character is introduced, the new character will follow the below rules. Characters will have experience points equal to the bottom of the level at which they died. (ex. A character is halfway through 10th level and is killed. The new character will start at the bottom of 10th level.) Starting wealth for the new character will be based on the level tier, as shown below. All other character creation rules apply.
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Character Deaths
Character Level Starting Gear
lst 4th
Normal starting equipment
5th l0th
500 den plus ldl0 x 25 den, normal starting equipment
11th 16th
5,000 den plus ldl0 x 250 den, two uncommon magic items, normal starting equipment
17th 20th
20 ,000 den plus ldl0 x 250 den, two uncommon magic items, one rare item, normal starting equipment
Downtime and Off-Adventure Activities

There is a possibility of having extended downtime or opportunities for side side activities. Due to this, each character will need to have some sort of trade skill or a way to make a living during this time. Generally the living costs will follow the table below.

Living Costs

Depending on how your character lives, they need to pay some living expenses. To offset this, its suggested that your character gain proficiency in a trade skill that will earn money.

Living Costs Daily / Weekly / Monthly / Yearly
Wretched —- / —- / —- / —-
Squalid 1 sp / 7 sp / 30 sp / 365 sp
Poor 2 sp / 14 sp / 60 sp / 730 sp
Modest 1 den / 7 den / 30 den / 365 den
Comfortable 2 den / 14 den / 60 den / 730 den
Wealthy 4 den / 28 den / 120 den / 1460 den
Aristocratic 10 den / 70 den / 300 den / 3650 den (minimum)
Downtime Activities

Possible downtime activities can be, but not limited to, the following activities. There are some downtime activities may need quests or mentoring to complete.

  • Crafting Items
  • Researching
  • Researching/Creating New Spells
  • Training
  • Building Strongholds
  • Carousing
  • Improve Relationships
  • Perform Sacred Rites
  • Running a Business
  • Sowing Rumors
  • Partaking in Hobbies/Recreational Activities
  • Taking Leadership Roles
Multiclassing

In some cases, quests or training mentors may be needed to completed in order to multiclass. So, for example, you are currently a Fighter and you would like to multiclass as a Wizard. You will need to seek out a mentor that was willing to take you on as an apprentice. The same would go with a Cleric class. Say you wanted to take levels of Warlock. You would need to seek out an entity and enter into a pact with them before you could take the class. Each class would have their own tasks that would need to be done.
With all of the above, I would need to know what your plans are ahead of time so that I can properly plan.

Crafting Rules
Harvesting Crafting Ingredients
Non-Creature Ingredients

A character with proficiency in a crafting skill can search an area for ingredients that may be used as crafting components. Depending on which ingredients are being looked for, the checks are made with a Nature, Arcana or Survival check (DC 15). Making a DC 20 will result in finding an abundance of ingredients. Once identified, the character can attempt to harvest the ingredients.

Harvesting Non-Creature Ingredients Table
DC* Explanation
DC 10 Standard. The character can harvest the item with minimal effort.
DC 15 Careful Harvesting is required.
DC 20 Careful Harvesting required and in a dangerous location.
* DC may be increased depending on weather, terrain and situational modifiers
Creature Ingredients

Harvesting ingredients from creatures is pretty straightforward. All creatures, with the exception of most humanoid types, have parts of their anatomy that can be harvested for food, used for crafting items or as additional material spell components. The DC for such a task is based on the creatures CR and equals the CR / 2, with a minimum of 15.

Skills Required

The skill to use for harvesting is based on the type of creature it is. Proficiency in a harvesting tool kit is required to harvest creature ingredients, while the skill checks may be shared among multiple characters using the help action.

Harvesting Skills Table
Creature Type Skill
Aberrations Nature*
Beasts Nature*
Celestials Religion
Constructs Arcana
Dragons Arcana
Elementals Arcana
Fey Nature*
Fiends Religion
Giants Nature*
Humanoids Nature*
Monstrosities Nature*
Oozes Nature*
Plants Nature*
Undead Religion
* The Survival skill may be used in place of the Nature skill.
Time Required

The amount of time that it takes to harvest the creature is based on its size, since larger creatures require more time.

Harvesting Time Table
Creature Size Harvesting Time
Tiny / Small 30 minutes
Medium / Large 1 hour
Huge 2 hours
Gargantuan 2+ hours
Example

For example, it’s easy to see that something mundane like a cow could be harvested for both food (measured in rations) and the hide can be made into leather. Now if you take something more exotic, like a dragon, and you can get more exotic and rare items. Let’s take an Adult Green Dragon for this example.
An adult green dragon is a huge dragon that has a CR of 15. Using the above tables, it would take a successful Arcana check (DC 23) and an hour of time. Successfully harvesting one would provide the following ingredients.

  • 1 Green Dragon Poison Gland
  • 1d6 Green Dragon Claws
  • 1d2 Green Dragon Fangs
  • 1 Green Dragon Hide
  • 1d2 Green Dragon Lung Tissue
  • 2d8 Green Dragon Scales
  • 2d8 Green Dragon Teeth
  • 1d2 Green Dragon Wings
  • 4d6 Rations

Depending on the components that you are harvesting, failing the harvesting check by 5 or more results in an injury. The injury would depend on what is being harvested. For the above example, failing the check could result in damage from the teeth, claws, fangs, etc. Failing the harvesting check by 6 or more results in multiple injuries and the destruction of any components of the creature.
These ingredients could be components for crafted items or can be used as additional material components when casting spells, which would add additional effects to particular spells. So, again with the above example, a few of the ingredients could be used in the following ways.

  • The teeth of the green dragon can be used to craft bolts/arrows that do an additional 1d6 poison damage.
  • The fang of a green dragon can be crafted into a slashing weapon that deals an additional 1d6 poison damage with this weapon.
  • The tissue of a green dragon’s lung can be a component for crafting magical items that are amphibious in nature. Consuming the green dragon’s lung tissue will provide the amphibious benefit for 8 hours.
Ingredient Properties and Experimentation

The properties of an ingredient could already be known by the character or they will need to be discovered. This can be done either by experimentation or with the use of knowledge skills. Experimenting involves using the character’s sense (smell, sight, touch, taste and in some cases, hearing) to gain insight as to what properties the ingredient may have. Extensive research in a library may also be substituted.

Crafting Items Crafting Item Example:

For example. If you want to make a magic item that is Rare or higher, then the components, formula, instructions, tutorship, etc will need to be acquired through quests. The higher the rarity, the higher the cost and the more dangerous/numerous the quests. So say you want to make a Flame Tongue weapon, which is a Rare Item. In order to create this item, you will need to perform the following tasks.

  • Acquire the schematics (likely purchased from a master blacksmith or found in treasure)
  • The schematics would have a list of components that would be needed. For the Flame Tongue, you would need these.
    • Masterwork weapon (whichever one you choose) If there is a special material, then that will need to be acquired as well
    • Purple orchid petals
    • Oak charcoal
    • Trapped essence of a Fire Elemental [This would be the quest portion]
  • Spend the time forging the weapon
Crafting Tools

Ultimately, the tool to used the craft the desired is up to the GM, but below is a list of tools with an explanation that can be used as a guideline. Please note that neither the tools nor the proficiency to use them brings with it any peripheral requirements. A forge is still required for a smith, or an oven/stove/campfire is required for a cook to use their tools.
Artisan Tools

  • Alchemist’s Supplies An Alchemist specializes is using rare or magical ingredients and turning them into various potions and elixirs that can aid the noble adventurer. Virtually any liquid except healing potions and poisons can be made with these supplies.
  • Brewer’s Supplies Are useful for crafting ales, stouts, wines, and other alcoholic beverages.
  • Calligrapher’s Supplies Calligrapher’s supplies are needed for the exquisite and precise penmanship that is used among high courts, as well as the careful inscription of magic into scrolls.
  • Carpenter’s Tools Carpenters are wood-workers. Not only can they be used to carve wood, they can be used to shape it and turn it into furniture, structures, containers etc.
  • Cartographer’s Tools Cartographer’s make maps by precisely surveying the land and accurately recording the wondrous landscapes they find.
  • Cobbler’s Tools Cobbler’s tools are necessary for making any good footwear from simple boots to fine dress shoes.
  • Cook’s Utensils Cooks can prepare and preserve fine meals, cheese, bread, meat, or entire banquets.
  • Glassblower’s Tools The most common use for a glassblower is to provide vials and flasks, though their skills also extend to hourglasses, lamps, lanterns, spyglasses and magnifying devices.
  • Jeweler’s Tools Jewelers tools are required to take an uncut, natural valuable stone, and turn it into a gem full of splendor. They can fashion necklaces, bracelets, and other decorative structures out of soft, valuable metals and other adornments.
  • Leatherworker’s Tools Leatherworkers work with the skinned hides of various creatures, turning them into slings, armor, bags, and even leather clothes.
  • Mason’s Tools Masons are good at designing and constructing some of the most sturdy structures made by man, as well as being capable of carving stones into specific shapes.
  • Painter’s Tools Artists trained with the brush can capture the beauty and essence of what they see and transfer it into the canvas. They are typically also adept at decorating and enhancing the appearance of whatever objects they can take their brushes to.
  • Potter’s Tools Using clay, potters can craft jugs, pots, flasks, vases and other ceramic containers.
  • Smith’s Tools Smiths tools are some of the most valuable tools and are used to shape metal into armor, weapons, and any other form of metal instrument.
  • Tinker’s Tools Tinkers are capable of crafting more complicated items that often involve some mechanical work such as scales, fishing tackle, and other rudimentary mechanical marvels.
  • Weaver’s Tools Weavers work with fabrics, spinning them into strings and chords and then weaving them into all manor of clothes, sacks, robes, rope, etc.
  • Woodcarver’s Tools Woodcarvers are simple woodworkers. As long as they start with a large enough piece of wood they can carve it into a myriad of shapes allowing them to create arrows, bolts, bows, staves, and even some shields.
  • Herbalism Kit Used by healers and medics, the Herbalism kits have the necessary equipment to create the magical healing potions, and other basic medical aids.
  • Poisoner’s Kit The Poisoner’s kit is often just a converted Herbalism kit, capable of crafting concoctions designed to end a life rather than save it.
Non-Magical / Mundane Items Crafting Non-Magical / Mundane Items

Due to the simplicity of crafting mundane or non-magical items, the process for crafting them is as follows.
The raw materials needed cost half of the items normal value. Each day that you spend crafting the item, brings you closer to completion. A simple formula is one day of work equals 5 den in progress towards the finished product. If the items is less than 5 den, then one day of work will make 5 den worth of items. Remaining time can be put towards additional crafting.

Crafting Alchemical Items

Alchemical items include an assortment of products made by alchemists, brewers and herbalists. Due to the nature of this, they are typically produced in batches of up to five consumable items of the same kind. Since they are done in batches, the progress for them is made at a different rate than that of mundane items. Alchemical items are produced at a rate of 10 den per day. Alchemical items do, at times, require specific rare or hard to obtain components. These components are included in the manufacturing costs.

Crafting Artistic Works Of Art

There are many creations that can be crafted that are not classified as mundane, magical or alchemical items. These are the paintings, the plays, the poems and songs that are created every day. Since the material components are minimal, at most, there is no material costs associated with these items. Furthermore, there really is not a way of gauging the market value of such items. To overcome this, the piece of work will need to be categorized and then use the assigned value for production.

Artistic Works Of Art Table
Artistic Quality Assigned Value
Ordinary 30 den
Compelling 120 den
Exceptional 400 den
Masterful 1,000 den
Legendary 2,000 den

Artistic Quality Explanations

  • Ordinary Ordinary works of art are the run of the mill items that can generally be found in nearly any shop or merchant.
  • Compelling Compelling works of art are a tad bit more harder to find than ordinary ones, but not that much more and still found in most shops or merchants.
  • Exceptional Exceptional works of art are created by true masters of the art. If they are found for sale, they would only be at high end shops in large cities.
  • Masterful When an artist crafts a Masterful work of art, it becomes a very select piece that artists are not generally willing to give up.
  • Legendary Legendary works of art are just that, Legendary. These one of a kind works that are generally the pinnacle of creation for an artist.
Magic Items
Magic Items Crafting Magic Items

Crafting magic items are some of the most difficult and complicated items to craft. It requires time, materials and skills, just like crafting any other item. However, crafting a magical item requires the crafter to have magical abilities and possibly a detailed schematic. The schematic is only required for items that are Rare or higher. Artifacts do not have schematics and cannot be crafted except under special circumstances. Progress for crafting a magic item is done at a rate of 2d den per day. Refer to the table below as it shows the character crafting a magic item must be of high enough level and the ability to cast spells. For items that replicate the effects of a specific spell, the crafter must know the spell and expend the spell slots listed on the table. Material components must also be present at the time of crafting.
Value. A magical version of a mundane item whose base cost is greater than 100 den (such as plate armor) will have the rarity value added to the crafting cost. For example, a set of adamantine plate mail (an uncommon magic item) would have a value of 2,000 den.

Enchanting Schematics

Every Magical item above Rare, with the exception of Artifacts which cannot be crafted, has a formula or schematic that needs to be acquired in order to craft the item. This formula will have the instructions needed and the list of components that will be needed for the item. If the components are not readily available, per discretion of the GM, then they must be found and acquired. Formulas can be purchased from merchants or guilds, found in treasure loots or acquired by … less than legal means. It is possible for characters to research and develop a formula. This would include spending a large amount of time researching in an adequate library or with a mentor, along with spending gold on development. In order to research a formula, you must already meet the requirements to craft it. At the end of the research, a successful skill check will need to be done to complete the process. If this check fails by less than 5, the character can spend additional time in order to complete. If this check fails by more than 5, all progress, supplies and gold pieces are lost. Creating a Common or Uncommon magic item does not require a formula, but all other requirements need to be met.

Magic Item Crafting
Rarity Minimum Level Value (Consumable) Value (Permanent) Spell Slots Expended Schematic DC
Common 3rd 50 den 100 den 1
Uncommon 3rd 100 den 500 den 5
Rare 6th 500 den 5,000 den 50 24
Very rare 11th 5,000 den 50,000 den 500 27
Legendary 17th 50,000 den 500,000 den 5,000 30

 

Upgrading Magical Items

Characters can upgrade existing magical items using the rules laid out, however, the cost to craft is the difference between the current and new enchantment. For example, if you have a +1 Longsword (Uncommon) to a Flame Tongue (Rare). You would need to acquire the schematics for the Flame Tongue, along with any other components needed. The cost would be the difference between the +1 Longsword (500 den) and the Flame Tongue (5,000 den), which would be 4,500 den. Adding additional enchantments would need to be handled on a case by case basis.

Constructs Crafting Constructs

Constructs are even more complex than magical items and are thus even more challenging to create. To have given life to a golem or shield guardian is truly the mark of the master artisan.
The following items are required for crafting a construct.

  • The proper tools (as seen on the Common Constructs table below)
  • An appropriate manual (see Construct Manuals below),
  • Material components
  • Time (equal to 5 × the construct’s CR days, minimum 1)
  • The ability to cast spells. Your caster level must be equal to or greater than the construct’s CR.

The material components needed for crafting a construct is equal to 25,000 den + (5,000 den × the construct’s CR). In some cases, specific exotic components or ingredients might be needed. Attempting to read a construct manual without meeting the caster level prerequisite results in taking 6d6 psychic damage as the complexity of what you see assaults your mind.
Furthermore, building a construct requires total and undivided attention. You must spend the requisite time working without interruption, with the manual in hand for the entire duration. You cannot do anything else while working on a construct, and if you pause or suspend the construction for any reason, any progress you have made is lost and all of the material components are wasted. Multiple people may work together to craft a construct, but every member must meet the requirements.

Construct Manuals

Prior to starting work, you must create or obtain a construct manual, which contains the schematics, instructions and incantations for how to assemble your construct and bring it to life. A manual can only be used once as the final incantation involves burning the tome and scattering its ashes onto the construct. The nature of the construct is determined by the manual that was used to create it. If you wish to create a custom creature, you must determine its game statistics when the manual is written. In general, a construct manual should be treated like any other consumable magic item, with the rarity determined by the CR of the construct, as shown in the following table:

Construct Manual Rarity
Construct CR Rarity
0 to 3 Uncommon
4 to 6 Rare
7 to 10 Very Rare
11+ Legendary
Repairing Constructs

You can repair any construct you have made by spending time working on it using the appropriate tools. For each hour you spend, the construct can roll one hit die and regain that number of hit points. This does not deplete its pool of hit dice.

Modifying Constructs

Once built, constructs can be modified in many ways. In general, the GM will have to determine appropriate costs and timeframes for this type of modification, since it is impossible to predict what kinds of modifications a player might want to make. As a guideline, anything that affects the CR calculation should cost more as an ‘aftermarket’ modification than it would have to include in the original design, to reflect the additional flexibility that such changes grant. For example:

  • Changing an iron golem’s sword to a warhammer (damage dice unchanged) should take 2.5 days and cost 2,500 den.
  • Adding armor plating to increase AC by 2 should take 5 days and cost 5,000 den.
  • Fitting hidden needles that add 4d8 poison damage to an iron golem’s fists should take 10 days and cost 10,000 den.
Common Constructs
Construct CR Cost Time Tools
Animated Armor 1 30,000 den 5 days Smith’s tools
Clay Golem 9 70,000 den 45 days Potter’s tools
Flesh Golem 5 50,000 den 25 days Leatherworker’s tools
Flying Sword 1/4 26,250 den 1 day Smith’s tools
Homunculus 0 25,000 den 1 day Potter’s tools
Iron Golem 16 105,000 den 80 days Smith’s tools
Shield Guardian 7 60,000 den 35 days Smith’s tools
Stone Golem 10 75,000 den 50 days Mason’s tools
Increasing Productivity

Sometimes, the progress per day just is simply not fast enough. Urgent orders or emergency situations may call for accelerated work, which can be achieved in several ways.

Working Together

Multiple characters can collaborate on a single item to make faster progress. Each worker must have their own set of tools, though they will need to share a workplace. For example, a pair of smiths working together will share the same forge and furnace but must bring their own hammers and tongs. Having an additional, proficient person assist you in crafting an item doubles your output for that day. You can work with another non-proficient person effectively, however your output is only 1.5 times more than normal. Each of the characters that are participating must be able to communicate with each other to effectively aid in the endeavor.

Overtime

You can commit more than the normal 8 hours per day of work to an item. If you do so, you can work up to 12 hours for the day, completing as much work as you would have in 1.5 full days of work. At the end, you must make a Constitution saving throw as if you had made a forced march. Hirelings and staff can work up to 4 hours of overtime, but you must pay them at double their normal rate, so the full 12 hours’ work costs the same as two normal, 8-hour days.

Crafting while Adventuring

There are many times when adventures just don’t have the downtime to create new items. Through the course of their day, they can find some free hours to work on projects. Depending on the situation and provided the character has the proper equipment, they can continue working on projects on the road. An 8 hour day can be split up into 2 hour increments and that time can be applied to the project. You may exchange 2 short rests for a 2 hour chunk of time.

Shortcuts

Most items can be made without necessarily following all of the usual steps. Doing so, however, puts the quality of the item at risk and could potentially result in the entire project being scrapped. If you wish to take a shortcut, the total value of the item (both in terms of crafting it and selling it) is reduced by 25%. Once the item is complete, you must then make an ability check using whichever ability score governs the specific tool set you are using to craft that item. The DC for this check depends on the type of item being made, as shown in the Item Complexity Table below. A successful check applies no further negative consequences. If the check fails by atleast 5, the item will function but the shortcut caused it to be defective in some way. Failing by more than 6 results in an item that does not function. The time, resources and materials spent on making the item are wasted.

Item Complexity Table
Item Type DC
Simple Items 15
Complex Items 20
Magic Items 25
Original Design 25
The Realms of Imrallon
Languages of Imrallon

The following languages are prevalent in the world of Imrallon. This, of course, is not a comprehensive list of all languages.

Languages
Standard Languages
Language Typical Speakers Script
Common Humans Common
Dwarven Dwarves Dwarven
Elven Elves Elven
Giant Ogres, Giants Dwarven
Gnomish Gnomes Dwarven
Goblin Goblinoids Dwarven
Halfling Halflings Common
Orcish Orcs Dwarven
Exotic Languages
Language Typical Speakers Script
Abyssal Demons Infernal
Celestial Celestials Celestial
Draconic Dragons Draconic
Deep Speech Aboleths, cloakers
Infernal Devils Infernal
Primordial Elementals Primordial
Auran Air Elementals Primordial
Aquan Water Elementals Primordial
Ignan Fire Elementals Primordial
Terran Earth Elementals Primordial
Sylvan Fey creatures Elven
Undercommon Underworld traders Elven
Learning New Languages

Characters who wish to learn new languages will need to have a teacher or some sort of item that will teach them. Depending on the degree of fluency and whether its speaking or reading/writing, will determine the time it takes for the character to learn the language, as shown on the table below.

Learning New Languages
Degree of Training Training Times
Basics (spoken) 1D6+4 weeks
Fluent (spoken) 1d6+4 months
Like a Native (spoken) 1D6+4 years
Alphabet 1d6+4 weeks
Read / Write 1d6+4 years
Currency of Imrallon
Coinage

Common coins come in several different denominations based on the relative worth of the metal from which they are made. The four most common coins are the platinum piece (pp), the denarius [/dəˈnerēəs/] (den), the silver piece (sp), and the copper piece (cp). A denarius is the equivalent to the gold piece (den) that is used in standard Dungeons and Dragons settings. However, in less civilized portions of the world, the standard is still called gold pieces. The denarius is the standard unit of measure for wealth, even if the coin itself is not commonly used. When merchants discuss deals that involve goods or services worth hundreds or thousands of denarius, the transactions don’t usually involve the exchange of individual coins. Rather, the denarius is a standard measure of value, and the actual exchange is in trade bars, letters of credit, or other valuable goods. Although nearly every kingdom or region use coins minted differently, it’s the material that they are made of that determines the value. Occasionally, due to political reasons or war, some kingdoms or regions will refuse to accept coin from a rival kingdom or region.

  • platinum piece (pp) — One platinum piece is worth 10 denarius, with is used by merchants. A laborer’s family could live on one platinum piece for a month.
  • denarius (den) — With one denarius, a character can buy a bedroll, 50 feet of good rope, or a goat. A skilled (but not exceptional) artisan can earn one denarius a day.
  • silver piece (sp) — One denarius is worth ten silver pieces, the most prevalent coin among commoners. A silver piece buys a laborer’s work for half a day, a flask of lamp oil, or a night’s rest in a poor inn.
  • copper piece (cp) — One silver piece is worth ten copper pieces, which are common among laborers and beggars. A single copper piece buys a candle, a torch, or a piece of chalk.

A standard coin weighs about a third of an ounce, so fifty coins weigh a pound.

Exchange Value cp sp Denarius pp
Copper piece (cp) 1 1/10 1/100 1/1000
Silver piece (sp) 10 1 1/10 1/100
Denarius (den) 100 10 1 1/10
Platinum piece (pp) 1000 100 10 1
Trade Bars

Large numbers of coins can be difficult to transport and account for, so many merchants prefer to use trade bars instead. Trade bars are ingots of precious metals and alloys that are likely to accepted by virtually anyone. Trade bars are stamped or engraved with the symbol of the trading coster or government that originally crafted them. A 1 pound trade bar of silver has a value of 5 den, a 1 pound gold bar is valued at 50 den, and heavier bars are worth proportionally more. Trade bars typically come in 1, 2, 5, and 10 pound weights.
The standard for this form of currency is silver trade bars. Occasionally, there will be copper bars and, even rarer, gold trade bars. These are only for the wealthiest and most powerful merchants and nobles, since only the largest transactions require a currency with such a high face value. Damaged trade bars are virtually worthless, but bars issued by defunct costers and fallen countries and rulers are usually worth face value.

Trade Bar Conversion
Trade Bar 1 lb 2 lbs 5 lbs 10 lbs
Copper 5 sp 1 den 25 sp 5 den
Silver 5 den 10 den 25 den 50 den
Gold 50 den 100 den 250 den 500 den
Other Types of Currency

Coins and bars are not the only form of hard currency.
In more isolated parts of the world, coins, bars and pearls are not used at all. These civilizations would generally use the teeth of creatures as currency. The system is the same as coin, only its based on size and the size is based on the size of the creature. The bigger the tooth, the more valuable it is.

Teeth Values
Tooth Size Examples Estimated Value
Tiny Imp, Sprite 1 cp
Small Giant Rat, Giant Shark 1 sp
Medium Basilisk, Harpy 1 den
Large Hippogriff, Dilophosaurus 5 den
Huge Triceratops, Stegosaurus 20 den
Gargantuan Kraken, Brachiosaurus 50 den

Some undersea races typically use pearls as currency, particularly those who dwell in the shallows and trade with surface races. The value of a pearl varies by size,a quarter-inch diameter is the standard, rarity (color), and quality (freedom from flaws).

Pearl Values
Perl Color Undersea Value On Land Value
White Pearl 1 cp 2 sp
Yellow Pearl 1sp 2 den
Green Pearl 1 den 20 den
Blue Pearl 5 den 100 den
Clear Pearl 500 den 2,000 den
Equipment

All items described in Chapter 5 of the Player’s Handbook are available to characters, provided one looks for them in a city of the appropriate size. In addition to the standard equipment available, characters in the Imrallon campaign setting have access to a number of items not listed in the Player’s Handbook.

Adventure Gear
Item Cost Weight
Bandoleer 5 sp 1/2lb
Chalk, Ice 1 sp
Clothes, Winter 10 den 10 lbs
Crampons 5 den 1 lb
Essential Oil (Vial) 25 den
Hammock 1 sp 2 lbs
Hut, Portable 100 den 75 lbs
Ice Axe 10 den 2 lbs
Incense (Block) 10 den
Insect netting 5 den 1 lb
Potion belt 1 den 1 lb
Scroll organizer 5 den 1/2 lb
Skis 20 den 10 lbs
Smelling Salts (Vial) 50 den
Snowshoes, pair 2 sp 4 lb.
Tarot deck 2 den
Games
Bag o’ Bones set 5 sp 1 lb
Chess set (common) 2 den 4 lbs
Chess set (fine) 25 den 10 lbs
Picalds set 1 den 2 lbs
Tool Kits
Disguise kit 25 den 3 lb.
Forgery kit 15 den 5 lb.
Scrimshaw kit 1 den 5 lb.
Adventure Gear

Bandoleer. This leather belt has loops or pouches for carrying eight small items (up to dagger size). It is usually worn across the chest.
Clothes, Winter. Specially-designed warm clothing grants its wearer immunity to the dangers of Cold and Arctic Cold temperatures.
Crampons. These spiked attachments can be fitted to any kind of footwear as an action. While wearing them, ice and icy surfaces do not count as difficult terrain, but base walking speed is reduced by 10 feet.
Essential Oil (Vial). 25 den. Essential oil can be used to produce a fragrance like incense (see below) by evaporating the contents of the vial using a special burner. When you do so, creatures within 60 feet of the burner have advantage on saving throws against being frightened.
Hammock. A hammock is a hemp or linen blanket with sturdy cords woven into it so that it can be strung up between two trees or other vertical supports.
Hut, Portable. This collapsible hut has enough room to sleep four medium creatures, and provides sufficient shelter to protect from extreme weather such as blizzards or sandstorms.
Ice Axe. An ice axe is a necessary component of a climbing kit when scaling ice cliffs; the kit cannot be used without one. In addition, it can be used as a simple weapon that deals 1d4 piercing damage and has the light and thrown (20/60) properties.
Ice Chalk. These waxy sticks come in many colors. They can write on icy surfaces, much as regular chalk writes on stone.
Incense (Block). 10 den. When an incense block is set alight, it burns for 1 hour, producing a fragrant smoke. The scent of the incense is obvious to humanoids within 60 feet and detectable (with a DC 15 Wisdom (Perception) check) within 120 feet; creatures with the Keen Smell trait double these distances.
Insect Netting: These sheets of fine mesh are made of fine silk or very fine linen. When draped around a sleeper in a bedroll or hammock, insect netting keeps away normal insects.
Marbles. About two dozen assorted glass, flawed rock crystal, or clay spheres in a leather pouch. Commonly used as a toy, but also useful for checking the slope in a dungeon corridor (just set one down and see which way it rolls), or as a nondamaging alternative to caltrops. One bag covers an area 5 feet square. A creature moving across the covered area must succeed on a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw or fall prone.
Potion Belt. This sturdy leather belt similar to a bandoleer has pockets shaped to hold six potion vials and is fitted with ties or flaps to keep the potions from falling out. Retrieving a potion from a potion belt is a free action once per round.
Skis. Wooden skis with horse hair (skins) bases for uphill traction and a pair of wooden poles that are used to steer. The skis should be equal to the characters height. A significant difference in size will impose disadvantage when using. While wearing the skis, characters can ignore snow as difficult terrain. Movement speed on snow is normal for uphill travel, 1.5x normal for level ground, and 2x speed for downhill. While speeding downhill, every 10 minutes characters must make a DC 15 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check to not fall prone or lose control of the skis, unless they have mountains or arctic as favored terrain, or have been trained. Training takes 2 days from an experienced teacher.
Smelling Salts (Vial). 50 den. When this vial is crushed as an action, it produces vapors which arouse consciousness. A creature that inhales the vapors gains advantage on saving throws against being stunned for 1 hour. It confers no benefit to undead, constructs, or creatures that don’t breathe.
Snowshoes.These high-tension nets of rope or sinew in wooden frames which are lashed to the feet spread your weight across the snow, making you much less likely to break through the crust and making walking much easier. Snowshoes ignore snow as difficult terrain. Movement speed on snow is normal when wearing snowshoes.
Tarot Deck. A deck of seventy-eight cards, typically made of lacquered paper or parchment, in a wooden case.

Games

Bag o’ Bones: This game is similar to the modern game of Jenga and is generally played on ships, however, the game is also played in many dockside taverns and inns. The bag contains similiar size and shaped bones that are stacked. The point of the game is to remove one bone at a time and not let the stack fall. This becomes increasingly harder as the ship moves along the ways. The object is to remove the bones from the pile you have dumped them into one at a time without toppling the pile. The set has “sticks” made from bones (usually those of a fowl) and a leather or metal canister for carrying them.
Chess. Chess game pieces include kings, queens, priests (bishops), knights, rooks (castles), and plebians (pawns). Sets often use deities as kings and queens. A set consists of thirty-two pieces and a wooden board in a wooden case. A fine set has ebony and ivory pieces and a marble board. A common set is made from more humble materials, such as carved and dyed wood.
Picalds. Picalds is similar to the modern game of checkers. A set consists of twenty-four clay or stone pieces and a board of alternating light and dark squares in a wooden case. The board is the same as a chessboard in pattern.

Kits

Herbalism Kit Used by healers and medics, the Herbalism kits have the necessary equipment to create the magical healing potions, and other basic medical aids.
Poisoner’s Kit The Poisoner’s kit is often just a converted Herbalism kit, capable of crafting concoctions designed to end a life rather than save it.
Scrimshaw Kit. This kit contains small knives, picks, and pins that allow the user to efficiently remove and work with the hides and bones of various creatures for crafting artwork, utensils, and makeshift arms and armor from animal carcasses.

Weapons and Armor Armor

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Armor
Armor Cost (den) Armor Class (AC) Strength Min Stealth Weight
Light Armor
Crocodile Leather 12 + Dex modifier 11 lbs.
Gnomish Workman’s Leather Armor 75 den 12 + Dex modifier 20 lbs.
Medium Armor
Bone Armor 13 + Dex Modifier (max 2) Disadvantage 18 lbs.
Brigandine 75 den 14 + Dex modifier (max 2) 15 lbs.
Buff Coat 50 den 12 + Dex modifier (max 2) 15 lbs.
Chitin Half Plate 14 + Dex Modifier (max 2) Disadvantage 15 lbs.
Owlbear Hide 13 + Dex Modifier (max 2) 13 lbs.
Heavy Armor
Bronze Plate 150 den 16 13 Disadvantage 45 lbs.
Chitin Plate 16 13 Disadvantage 30 lbs.

Crocodile Leather. This armor is makeshift leather armor crafted from the skin of a giant crocodile, using the below rules for making armor. You must make a successful DC 12 Nature or Survival check to harvest the raw materials.
Gnomish Workman’s Leather This armor is a natural consequence of tinker gnomes designing things and experiencing unforeseen consequences. Adorned with dozens of tiny tool holders and pouches, typically filled with the most bizarre collection of coins, screwdrivers, sprockets, trinkets, pens, and detritus, all the little items amount to the protection of studded leather armor. As with most gnomish inventions, the compilation of disjointed parts running headlong into tinker absent-mindedness means the dizzying array of doodads will change from day to day. The armor has a storage capacity of 10 lbs.
This type of armor is rarely even seen, much less used, among non-gnomes, except for halflings. Halflings are the only creatures who can remotely fit the armor, and they have a weakness for the many secret pockets. Some rogues have a fondness for it, using it to conceal the many tools of their trade. Usually, workman’s armor isn’t considered armor at all, and is only worn by tinker gnomes while at their work. Adventuring gnomes sometimes wear it, however, because they find it so handy.
Bone Armor. This armor is essentially bone fragments strung together with pieces of leather, typically worn over a suit of leather armor, with the bones secured to the leather to prevent them from sliding around during combat. Larger animals are preferred over smaller ones; the animal’s smaller bones are used to cover the arms and legs, while the larger bones are used to protect the chest and back.
Brigandine. Brigandine is a form of body armor which is common in Cormyr and Sembia, as it was an inexpensive way to protect their men-at-arms during the later War. A brigandine is a garment which covers the torso. The garment—generally heavy cloth, canvas, or leather—is lined with small, oblong steel plates. It is commonly worn over a lightly-padded doublet. Some versions have relatively large metal plates, while others have smaller. Either way, brigandine is a flexible armor, though not as flexible as cloth or soft leather, allowing easy movement as compared to heavy armors. Coats of plates, such as brigandine, are generally the best armor a run-of-the-mill village smith can make, and only then in conjunction with a tailor or leatherworker. Brigandine is more difficult to construct than cloth, hide, or leather armors, and is outside the skill set of an individual character to make as it requires the skills of both tailor and smith and a significant amount of downtime.
Buff Coat. A buff coat is a form of hide armor with long skirts which protect the thighs to the knee. Often decorated with embroidery or metallic lace, it is worn as much as a statement of status as practical protection on the battlefield. Militia members in prosperous towns and cities often attend drill practice sessions in their finest buff coat. Buff coats turn sword blows and arrows with ease, though they are not proof against bullets. It is possible to wear a breastplate over a buff coat, though the AC then defaults to the breastplate’s; the armor ratings do not stack.
Chitin Half-Plate. Chitin half-plate armor is made from the shell of a creature such as a giant insect or crab, using the below rules for making armor. You must make a successful DC 14 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check to harvest the raw materials.
Owlbear Hide. Owlbear hide armor is makeshift armor crafted from the skin of an owlbear, using the above rules for Making Armor. You must make a successful DC 14 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check to harvest the raw materials.
Bronze Plate. Bronze plate is made of heavy metal plates attached by rivets or sewed to a leather or heavy cloth garment worn over padded armor. Because it does not use iron-based metal, this armor is immune to the effect of rust monster attacks and similar perils. However, its protective quality is not as good as splint or plate. In general, bronze plate is designed to be lighter and more flexible than splint or plate armor. Bronze plate is usually only found in cultures which have not yet mastered steel, or in places where rust monsters are common.
Chitin Plate. Chitin Plate is a full suit of plate armor made from the shells of creatures such as giant insects or giant crabs, using the below rules for making armor. You must make a successful DC 16 Nature or Survival check to harvest the raw materials.
Buckler. Sometimes called a “target,” a buckler is a small, round shield which is either held in, or strapped to, the forearm of the off-hand. It can be worn by those wielding crossbows or polearms with no hindrance to the use of those weapons. In addition, you can use it as an improvised weapon dealing 1d4 bludgeoning damage if you can make off-hand strikes as part of your Attack action. You don’t need to be proficient in shields to use a buckler.
Chitin Shield. A Chitin shield is made from the shell of a creature such as a giant insect or crab. You must make a successful DC 12 Nature or Survival check to harvest the raw materials and craft the shield.

Weapons
Weapons
Weapon Cost (den) Damage Weight Properties
Martial Weapons
Javelin with Atl-Atl 1d8 piercing 1 lb. Thrown (range 20/60)
Bola 5 den 1d4 bludgeoning 2 lbs. Thrown (range 20/60)
Boomerang 5 den 1d6 bludgeoning 1 lb. Thrown (range 20/60)
Cestus 15 den 1d6 slashing 2 lbs. Finesse, light
Claw Gauntlet 5 den 1d4 slashing 2 lb. Light, fist

Atl-Atl. An atl-atl is not a weapon. It is a tool which makes a weapon better. An atl-atl is a short stick with a broad, shallow groove along its length and a knot at the end. You place a javelin in it so that the javelin butt rests against the knot and the javelin lies along the groove; you hold the other end. When you fling your javelin, you use the atl-atl as a lever, allowing you to throw the javelin much farther and with more power than with the hand alone. When used with an atl-atl, your javelin acquires the characteristics shown in the table above. If you wish to craft an atl-atl, you must have sufficient materials and make a successful DC 10 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check during a short or long rest.
Bola. Useful as a weapon for entangling as well as damaging victims, the bola consists of one or more two-foot leather straps with several weights attached to the ends. The opposite ends of the straps are knotted together to make a handle. The weights may be stone, bone, or ivory, spherical or egg-shaped. For good luck, some users carve the weights to resemble birds or other animals. To attack, you grip the handle, whirl the weighted strands over your head, then fling the bola at a target within range. If it hits, the strands wrap around the target and the weights smash into its body. In addition, the target must succeed on a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw or become restrained. As an action, the victim can make a successful DC 10 Strength check to free itself.
Boomerang. This curved throwing stick can hit targets at long distances. Boomerangs are less than 2 feet long, weigh under half a pound, and are typically made of wood. If you attack with your boomerang and miss your target, the boomerang arcs in the air and returns to you. If you make a successful DC 10 Dexterity saving throw, you catch it. On a failure, it falls to the ground in unoccupied space 10 feet away from you. If you wish to craft a boomerang, you must have access to suitable materials and make a successful DC 14 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check during a short or long rest.
Cestus. The cestus is a gladiator’s weapon, a glove studded with sharp spikes on the back and across the knuckles. Gladiators fighting with the cestus usually wear two, one on each hand (the plural is cesti). Cestus combat is very popular with arena crowds because it is extremely bloody and up-close. Any weaponsmith can make a pair of cesti if you provide a description.
Claw Gauntlet. These weapons are gauntlets or wraps that cover the wearer’s forearms. The main purpose of these gauntlets or wrappings is to hold in place fine metal claws that the wearer uses to slash at their enemies. These claws can be retracted, without being removed, so that their wearers can interact with objects and the environment freely. This weapon can be used with unarmed attacks.

Farm Livestock
Farm Livestock
Animal Cost Weight (lbs)
Ape 150 den 350.00 lbs
Boar 10 den 100.00 lbs
Bull 20 den 1,000.00 lbs
Calf 5 den 50.00 lbs
Camel 15 den 900.00 lbs
Capon 3 cp 0.00 lbs
Cat 1 sp 10.00 lbs
Chicken 3 cp 10.00 lbs
Cow 10 den 750.00 lbs
Dog,guard 100 den 80.00 lbs
Dog,hunting 50 den 65.00 lbs
Dog,lap 20 den 50.00 lbs
Dog,sled 40 den 80.00 lbs
Dog,war 120 den 95.00 lbs
Donkey 8 den 800.00 lbs
Dove 3 cp 2.00 lbs
Elephant,labor 300 den 10,000.00 lbs
Elephant,war 1,200 den 12,000.00 lbs
Falcon,trained 1,200 den 8.00 lbs
Goat 1 den 60.00 lbs
Goose 5 cp 0.00 lbs
Guinea hen 2 sp 0.00 lbs
Hawk,large 180 den 40.00 lbs
Hawk,small 40 den 7.00 lbs
Horse,draft 300 den 800.00 lbs
Horse,heavy war 500 den 1,300.00 lbs
Horse,light war 250 den 700.00 lbs
Horse,medium war 360 den 900.00 lbs
Horse,riding 80 den 600.00 lbs
Hunting cat 10,000 den 175.00 lbs
Lama 30 den 650.00 lbs
Mule 20 den 700.00 lbs
Ox 15 den 1,000.00 lbs
Partridge 5 cp 0.00 lbs
Peacock 5 cp 0.00 lbs
Pig 3 den 300.00 lbs
Pigeon 1 cp 1.50 lbs
Pigeon, homing 100 den 0.00 lbs
Piglet 1 den 10.00 lbs
Pony,riding 25 den 400.00 lbs
Pony,war 35 den 450.00 lbs
Ram 4 den 0.00 lbs
Sheep 2 den 50.00 lbs
Songbird 1 den 1.00 lbs
Swan 1 sp 0.00 lbs
Yak 9 den 480.00 lbs
Artisan Tools
Artisan’s tools
Artisan Tool Cost Weight
Alchemist’s supplies 50 den 8 lb.
Brewer’s supplies 20 den 9 lb.
Calligrapher’s supplies 10 den 5 lb.
Carpenter’s tools 8 den 6 lb.
Cartographer’s tools 15 den 6 lb.
Cobbler’s tools 5 den 5 lb.
Cook’s utensils 1 den 8 lb.
Glassblower’s tools 30 den 5 lb.
Jeweler’s tools 25 den 2 lb.
Leatherworker’s tools 5 den 5 lb.
Mason’s tools 10 den 8 lb.
Painter’s supplies 10 den 5 lb.
Potter’s tools 10 den 3 lb.
Smith’s tools 20 den 8 lb.
Tinker’s tools 50 den 10 lb.
Weaver’s tools 1 den 5 lb.
Woodcarver’s tools 1 den 5 lb.

Artisan Tool Descriptions

  • Alchemist’s Supplies An Alchemist specializes is using rare or magical ingredients and turning them into various potions and elixirs that can aid the noble adventurer. Virtually any liquid except healing potions and poisons can be made with these supplies.
  • Brewer’s Supplies Are useful for crafting ales, stouts, wines, and other alcoholic beverages.
  • Calligrapher’s Supplies Calligrapher’s supplies are needed for the exquisite and precise penmanship that is used among high courts, as well as the careful inscription of magic into scrolls.
  • Carpenter’s Tools Carpenters are wood-workers. Not only can they be used to carve wood, they can be used to shape it and turn it into furniture, structures, containers etc.
  • Cartographer’s Tools Cartographer’s make maps by precisely surveying the land and accurately recording the wondrous landscapes they find.
  • Cobbler’s Tools Cobbler’s tools are necessary for making any good footwear from simple boots to fine dress shoes.
  • Cook’s Utensils Cooks can prepare and preserve fine meals, cheese, bread, meat, or entire banquets.
  • Glassblower’s Tools The most common use for a glassblower is to provide vials and flasks, though their skills also extend to hourglasses, lamps, lanterns, spyglasses and magnifying devices.
  • Jeweler’s Tools Jewelers tools are required to take an uncut, natural valuable stone, and turn it into a gem full of splendor. They can fashion necklaces, bracelets, and other decorative structures out of soft, valuable metals and other adornments.
  • Leatherworker’s Tools Leatherworkers work with the skinned hides of various creatures, turning them into slings, armor, bags, and even leather clothes.
  • Mason’s Tools Masons are good at designing and constructing some of the most sturdy structures made by man, as well as being capable of carving stones into specific shapes.
  • Painter’s Tools Artists trained with the brush can capture the beauty and essence of what they see and transfer it into the canvas. They are typically also adept at decorating and enhancing the appearance of whatever objects they can take their brushes to.
  • Potter’s Tools Using clay, potters can craft jugs, pots, flasks, vases and other ceramic containers.
  • Smith’s Tools Smiths tools are some of the most valuable tools and are used to shape metal into armor, weapons, and any other form of metal instrument.
  • Tinker’s Tools Tinkers are capable of crafting more complicated items that often involve some mechanical work such as scales, fishing tackle, and other rudimentary mechanical marvels.
  • Weaver’s Tools Weavers work with fabrics, spinning them into strings and chords and then weaving them into all manor of clothes, sacks, robes, rope, etc.
  • Woodcarver’s Tools Woodcarvers are simple woodworkers. As long as they start with a large enough piece of wood they can carve it into a myriad of shapes allowing them to create arrows, bolts, bows, staves, and even some shields.
Vehicles Ground Vehicles
Ground Vehicles
Vehicle Cost Weight
Sled, Dog 10 den 100 lbs
Sled, War 300 den 150 lbs

Sled, Dog. This small, light, manoeuvrable sled is intended to be dragged by one or more, specially bred, sled dogs.
Sled, War. A war sled is a large vehicle, festooned with spikes and usually pulled by powerful beasts, such as worgs, dire wolves, etc. It requires one driver, and the fighting platform can accommodate up to two more medium or smaller creatures, who benefit from half cover. The sled itself has an AC of 15, 100 hit points and a damage threshold of 10. Any creature that the war sled moves within 5 feet of must make a Dexterity saving throw (DC equal to half the total distance moved this turn) or take 1d8 slashing damage.

Boats and Ships

Each of the vessels presented in this section includes a short statistics block describing the vessel. A ship’s statistics block includes the following entries.

  • Size. The size of the vehicle, using the same size categories as creatures do.
  • Seaworthiness. The ship’s overall sturdiness. This modifier is applied to any Wisdom (Vehicle) checks the pilot makes in order to avoid foundering, sinking, and hazards that large, well-built vessels avoid more easily than small and frail ones.
  • Shiphandling. The ship’s agility and nimbleness. This modifier is applied to any Wisdom (Vehicle) checks the pilot makes in order to avoid collisions, come about, sail close to the wind, and other situations that small, swift vessels avoid more easily than large and clumsy ones.
  • Speed. The ship’s sailing speed. Sailing vessels have an asterisked speed entry, since the actual sailing speed varies with the wind speed and direction.
  • AC. The armor class of the ship.
  • HP. The number of max hit points of the ship.
  • Rigging >HP. The number of hit points and the AC of the masts and/or rigging.
  • DR. The damage reduction of a ship. Damage from non-magical attacks is reduced by this amount. Generally rigging has DR 0.
  • Ram. The damage dealt by the vehicle per 10’ of speed it currently possesses if it rams another object. For example, a ship with a base ram damage of 3d6 deals 3d6 points of damage if moving at a speed of 10’, 6d6 at a speed of 20’, 9d6 at a speed of 30’, and so on.
  • Crew. The number of crewmembers necessary to make course changes, adjust for wind changes, and generally handle the ship. Usually the crew consists of a lookout or two, and a small number of deckhands who can go aloft to change the set of the sails as necessary. On an oar-powered vessel, the crew includes the number of rowers necessary for the ship to make use of its full oared speed.
  • Complement. The first number in this entry is the ship’s complement, or the total number of Small or Medium humanoids that can normally be carried on board as crew and passengers. The second number is the ship’s crew requirement, or the minimum number of people necessary to control the ship without penalty. The third number, when present, indicates the number of rowers required in addition to the normal crew; a ship doesn’t need rowers to sail, but does need rowers to use its oared movement rate.
  • Cargo. The capacity of the vehicle’s hold, in tons (1 ton = 2,000 pounds). Most ships are slowed if carrying half this load or more.
  • Mounts. The number of weapons the ship can mount. A light mount is suitable for a ballista or catapult. A heavy mount is suitable for a bombard.
  • Cost. The ship’s cost in denarius.
Boats and Ships
Vessel Size Seaworthiness Shiphandling Speed (Wind, Oar) AC >Hit Points Rigging Ram Dmg Complement Cargo Cost Mounts
Cog Colossal Vehicle (Water) +2 -2 2 mph 15 400 (DR 10) 150 HP, 13 AC 4d6 per 10′ 20/4 40 tons 6,000 den 1 light, 1 heavy
Galley Colossal Vehicle (Water) +0 -2 1.5 mph* or 2 mph 15 400 (DR 10) 150 HP, 13 AC 4d6 per 10′ 300/10/160 150 tons 30,000 den 6 light, 3 heavy, ram
Greatship Colossal Vehicle (Water) +6 -4 2.5 mph* 15 400 (DR 10) 200 HP, 13 AC 6d6 per 10′ 500/20 500 tons 60,000 den 12 light, 4 heavy
Junk Colossal Vehicle (Water) +4 +0 1.5 mph* 15 250 (DR 10) 200 HP, 13 AC 4d6 per 10′ 50/7 160 tons 15,000 den 2 light, 2 heavy
Kayak Large Vehicle (Water) +4 2 mph 12 50 2/1 25 den None
Keelboat Colossal Vehicle (Water) -2 +2 1 mph* or 1 mph 15 250 (DR 10) 150 HP, 13 AC 3d6 per 10′ 16/3/12 20 tons 3,000 den 1 light
Longship Colossal Vehicle (Water) +2 +0 1.5 mph* or 2 mph 15 250 (DR 10) 150 HP, 13 AC 4d6 per 10′ 60/3/40 40 tons 10,000 den 2 light
Pinnace Gargantuan Vehicle (Water) +2 +2 3 mph* or 0.5 mph 15 250 (DR 10) 150 HP, 13 AC 3d6 per 10′ 15/3/8 4,500 den 2 light
Riverboat Huge Vehicle (Water) +0 +2 1.5 mph 15 250 (DR 10) 2d6 per 10′ 8/2 4 tons 500 den None
Rowboat Large Vehicle (Water) -4 +2 1 mph 16 150 (DR 10) 1d6 per 10′ 4/1 1,000 pounds 50 den None
Sailing Ship Colossal Vehicle (Water) +4 +2 3 mph* 15 400 (DR 10) 200 HP, 13 AC 4d6 per 10′ 30/7 120 tons 10,000 den 2 light, 1 heavy
Trireme Colossal Vehicle (Water) +0 +2 2 mph* or 3 mph 15 600 (DR 20) 200 HP, 13 AC 4d6 per 10′ 200/30/170 10 tons 20,000 den 4 light, 1 heavy, ram
Warship Colossal Vehicle (Water) +0 +2 2 mph* or 3 mph 15 400 (DR 10) 200 HP, 13 AC 4d6 per 10′ 200/7/100 150 tons 25,000 den 4 light, 2 heavy, ram

*Base sailing speed
Cog. The cog is the basic medieval-era sailing ship. It is a single-masted sailing ship with a round, sturdy hull. It has a partial deck (the waist of the ship is not decked over, but the ends
are) and raised bow and stern platforms that are open, as opposed to being enclosed like a true forecastle or sterncastle. It is seaworthy, but not very handy in adverse winds. Nefs, roundships, or knorrs use these same statistics. A knorr or roundship also has an oar speed of 5′ in addition to the sailing speed.
Galley. Also known as the quinquireme, or great galley, this is the largest oared vessel normally built. It is fully decked, with a complicated arrangement of oars in multiple banks. Great galleys are usually warships, vessels whose primary purpose is service in a fleet.
Greatship. Fitted with a towering forecastle and sterncastle, this huge, broad-beamed sailing ship is almost a seagoing castle. It has four masts and is not remotely nimble, but it is large and sturdy and can carry hundreds of sailors and soldiers. It has multiple decks, and the mainmast often has one or more fighting tops, small platforms suitable for archers to fire down at other ships. Greatships are sometimes called carracks.
Junk. A junk is a large sailing ship often found in eastern waters. It has a flat bottom, no keel, and a high stern, with three masts and a sail reinforced with bamboo ribs. The junk’s hull is partitioned into a number of small, watertight compartments, which makes it unusually seaworthy.
Kayak. A kayak is a lightweight boat powered by rowing.
Keelboat. This flat-bottomed boat is built for use on rivers and lakes. It is fully decked, with a large deckhouse that takes up most of the boat’s center or stern depending on the design. It has a small sail and eight or more oars for traveling upstream.
Longship. The longship is a sturdy vessel with a single mast. It does not have a deck, although some longships are built with small walks or platforms at the stern and bow. The shallow draft of a longship allows it to enter rivers or land on beaches that other vessels couldn’t manage.
Penteconter. Penteconters are medium vessels of an old design, still favored by heroes and pirates alike. They have a single row of oars down each side, summing fifty in all, and an oarsman to each. The rowers are typically warriors; the hero’s company or a pirate’s raiding party. Storage space below deck is limited, and these ships must stay close to the coast or chart direct routes through open water. To support such a large crew, they must harbor frequently to barter or pillage supplies.
Pinnace. The pinnace is a small, two-masted sailing vessel. It’s sturdy enough to undertake long open-water voyages and handy enough to use close to shore. A pinnace is fully decked, but its sterncastle is hardly worthy of the name; it’s little more than a cramped cabin.
Riverboat. The Riverboat is a large, open boat with a stout, round-bottomed hull that can stand up to surprisingly rough seas. Riverboats are often carried by larger ships for use in landing in places where the larger ship can’t go.
Rowboat. Also called a skiff, punt, or pirogue, this is a flat-bottomed boat for use in calm waters.
Trireme. Triremes are large warships and are the standard of naval warfare. They boast crews of two hundred , with one hundred and fifty set to the ship’s three rows of oars. Their prows are often cased in bronze or iron to make for devastating rams.
Sailing Ship. The sailing ship is a seaworthy, nimble ship that can handle long ocean crossings. It has a small forecastle and sterncastle, and three masts. A sailing ship is a smooth-hulled, full-decked vessel built on a strong internal frame. It is a relatively advanced design, and not every seafaring people have the skills and knowledge to build one. A favored among many trading costers.
Warship. The warship is a medium-sized galley that is fast, nimble, and eminently suitable for warfare. It has two masts and sails better than it rows with any kind of favorable wind. It is fully decked, and the rowers are covered from attack. The warship usually has a small deckhouse or fighting platform at the stern. The warship is the most advanced galley design, and not many seafaring folk have the expertise and skills to build a warship.

Special Ship Augmentations

You may find that your ships needs further modifications. The augmentations listed below are not possible for some ships. Use your common sense, but as a general guide they are not available to smaller ships (less than 50 feet in length). It will take at least 1 week to add any of these, perhaps longer if the materials are not readily available.
Additional Passenger Space / Crew Quarters. This translates into more space for a ship’s sailors to sleep and eat. The ship may support 10% more passengers, but its cargo capacity is decreased by 10%.
Cost: 20% of base ship cost
Armor Plating. By attaching metal plates to the ship, the hull’s hit points are increased by +15. This modification reduces a ship’s cargo capacity by 15%. The armor plating imposes a –1 penalty on all sailing checks, and slows the ship by 1 mph.
Cost: 30% of base ship cost
Broad Rudder. A wide rudder makes a ship more nimble, granting a +1 bonus on all sailing checks.
Cost: 500 den
Concealed Weapon Port. The ship’s belowdecks area undergoes major reconstruction in order to provide a light mounts for siege engines. A concealed weapon port can only be recognized on a successful DC 15 Wisdom (Perception) check. Each concealed port reduces a ship’s cargo capacity by 5 tons, in addition to the space required by the weapon itself.
Cost: 200 den per port (in addition to the cost of the weapons)
Extended Keel. The ship’s keel is longer than usual for a vessel of its type. The ship’s measurements from bow to stern are 10% longer than normal, though cargo capacity is not appreciably affected. The ship is more stable, and grants a +1 bonus on all sailing checks. This improvement must be installed at the time of the ship’s construction and cannot be added later.
Cost: 10% of base ship cost
Figurehead. Some ships sport fanciful carvings on their bowsprits. This modification is strictly cosmetic, with no real impact on game play. Players are encouraged to design their own custom figureheads, such as dolphins, mermaids, and other such creatures of myth.
Cost: 100–1,000 den, depending on the port and the craftsman
Increased Cargo Capacity. An efficient remodeling of the ship’s layout means more room for the ship’s stores. The ship’s cargo capacity is increased by 10%.
Cost: 15% of base ship cost
Narrow Hull. The ship has been intentionally designed with a more slender hull, enabling it to slip through smaller spaces. The ship’s beam (width) is decreased by 20%, and cargo capacity is reduced by 10%. However, the ship gains a +2 bonus on all sailing checks. This improvement must be installed at the time of the ship’s construction and cannot be added later.
Cost: 15% of base ship cost
Ramming Prow. The ship bears a standard ram, usually sheathed in bronze or iron, mounted on its bow. A ship equipped with a Ramming Prow does an additional 1d4 damage to the enemy ship for every 1 mph of ship speed on a successful ram maneuver.
Cost: 1,000 den
Rapid-Deploy Sails. The ship’s rigging undergoes a wholesale change as improvements in engineering enable the sails to be raised and lowered much faster than normal. Any sail adjustments can be made in half the normal time, granting a +1 bonus on all sailing checks.
Cost: 10% of base ship cost
Silk Sails. Few ship improvements are as beautiful as the addition of silk sails. These sails can be designed in whatever color the player desires; they are often embroidered with striking images of the sea. Such sails are usually imported from faraway lands. Silk sails give the ship superior rates of movement, as they capture and displace the wind more efficiently. A ship with silk sails gains a +1 bonus on opposed sailing checks. The ship’s tactical speed is increased by 1 mph.
Cost: 15% of base ship cost
Smuggling Compartments. The ship’s bulkheads are modified so that gaps between them can serve as hidden cargo storage areas. This does not change a ship’s cargo capacity. A DC 20 Wisdom (Perception) check is required to locate smuggling compartments in a search of the ship. A ship can be fitted with no more than four smuggling compartments.
Cost: 500 den per 5-foot-square compartment
Sturdy Hull. The ship’s body has had additional supports
and layers of wood added to it, making it thicker and more resilient. The hull’s damage threshold is increased by 2, but the ship’s cargo capacity is reduced by 10%.
Cost: 10% of base ship cost
Wooden Plating. For protection during naval combat, this ship has received additional wooden planks nailed to its hull. The hull’s hit points are increased by 5% and its damage threshold is increased by 2. However, this reduces cargo capacity by 10% as extra room must be made inside for beams to support the reinforcements. The speed is reduced by 1 mph (to a minimum of 1 mph).
Cost: 20% of base ship cost

Animal Companions

What do you do when a player decides they want their character to own a pet? The simple solution is to have them play a Beastmaster ranger or an arcane spellcaster who can cast find familiar, but what if a character of a different class finds an animal they wish to keep as a pet? Perhaps they don’t want the hassle of dipping into a class with a built-in pet, but still want some mechanical benefit to having an animal around. Maybe your player hasn’t found such an animal, but they’ve expressed interest in their character having some sort of animal companion. These rules allow player characters of all classes to adopt pets of their very own, while ensuring that rangers’ animal companions and spellcasters’ familiars remain more potent options.

Eligible Animals

Pets must be beasts of 1/4 challenge rating or lower and an intelligence of 3 or lower, with the exception of the warhorse. A creature must be trained before it can be effective in combat. A wild creature must be domesticated before it is trained. Finding the right place and person to purchase an animal from can be difficult; while the average human or elven city will have horses, cats, and dogs for sale, finding a pre-trained giant lizard or flying snake may be difficult in some campaign settings. That said, a town in a deep jungle or swamp may well have such creatures for sale, while an underground city may sell giant fire beetles to dungeon delvers. Similarly, in some far northern climates, there might be domesticated elk for sale, but this is rare.

Care and Feeding

Each pet adds 1 sp/day per size category to lifestyle expenses. For example, a Tiny rat only costs 1 sp/day, while a Large warhorse requires 4 sp/day. An owner can hunt food for their animal, or the animal can be trained to hunt for itself, halving the cost. The remaining cost represents other types of care, such as medicine, shelter, and toys. When training a domesticated animal to perform actions on command, the base lifestyle cost doubles. Thus, if you were teaching your Tiny rat to take the Perform action (described below in the Non-Combat Actions section), it would cost and additional 1 sp/day as long as you were teaching your rat. This cost represents things like extra treats and supplies.
Domesticating a wild animal increases the cost to 1 den/day per size category. A Medium wolf, for instance, costs a full 3 den/day to domesticate. This cost reflects the increased price of keeping the animal safely contained, and the comparatively larger amounts and more exotic types of food a wild animal requires.

Domesticating an Animal

A wild animal must be reared from infancy to become domesticated. Sometimes, wild animals can be found semi-domesticated by monsters, such as wolves with goblins, or hyenas with gnolls. These animals can be re-trained as adults to be loyal to a party member.
Domesticating a wild animal uses a variant of the optional loyalty rules for NPCs. An animal’s loyalty score is on a scale from 0 to 20. An animal’s maximum loyalty is equal to the Wisdom score of its owner. Wild animals start at loyalty 0. Animals trained by monsters start at loyalty 5. To domesticate an animal, a player must make one Animal Handling check. The Animal Handling check has a DC of 10 + the animal’s HD. Success means that the animal’s loyalty increases by one point. Failure means that loyalty does not increase; failure by more than five means that the animal’s loyalty decreases by one point. Dealing damage to an animal, pushing an animal beyond its limits, frightening an animal, or failing to feed or care for an animal lowers an animal’s loyalty by 1 point per day.
An animal that reaches loyalty 10 is domesticated and loyal to its trainer. The animal will now follow its owner to the best of its ability. It will not obey commands more complex than “follow,” nor will it enter a dangerous situation of its own volition. If an animal is forced into a dangerous situation, it will cower until the danger passes. If the owner was the one who deliberately led the animal into the situation in question, the pet’s loyalty score decreases by 1 point.

Training an Animal

A pet owner can continue to build loyalty with an animal after it has been domesticated; this allows the animal to be trained. A trained animal can take actions when commanded. Most commands must be verbal, though hand signals can be used if the animal has line of sight to its owner. Every point of loyalty beyond 10 allows you to teach an animal one additional action that it is physically capable of performing. If an animal becomes owned by someone with a Wisdom score lower than 10 + the number of skills the animal knows, the animal does not forget any of its known actions.
Non-Combat Actions
These are some examples of actions and tricks a pet can learn. A pet cannot be commanded to act in combat unless it has been trained in combat actions.

  • Guard. The pet watches an area and performs an action specified by their owner if someone enters the area, such as alerting its owner or attacking. If the intruder attempts to sneak in, compare their Dexterity (Stealth) check against the animal’s passive Wisdom (Perception) score to determine if they are detected.
  • Harness. This pet can be harnessed to a cart or plow, allowing it to carry larger objects or work on a farm.
  • Hide. The pet takes the Hide action.
  • Hunt. The pet makes a DC 10 Wisdom (Survival) check. If it succeeds, it finds small game native to the region, and brings its prey back to its owner.
  • Intimidate. The animal makes a DC 10 Charisma (Intimidation) check. If it succeeds, the pet’s owner gains advantage on all Intimidation checks they make this round.
  • Light Source. The pet carries a light source for the party. The pet can be commanded to walk 10 feet in ahead of or behind its owner. If the pet is naturally bioluminescent, it does not need to carry a light source.
  • Messenger. The pet can carry a message or object to a destination or recipient. The pet must be familiar with either the recipient or the destination in order to deliver the message.
  • Mount. The pet can be ridden if it is at least one size category larger than its rider.
  • Perform. The pet may aid an owner’s Performance check by making a DC 10 Charisma check. If the pet succeeds, the owner gains advantage on that Performance check.
  • Search. If the pet succeeds at a DC 10 Wisdom (Perception) check, the pet’s owner gains advantage on a Perception or Investigation check to find secret doors, traps, corpses, unusual features (a strange sound, smell, etc.) or food.
  • Track. The pet makes a DC 10 Wisdom (Survival) check. On a success, it grants advantage to its owner’s Survival check to track an individual or creature.

A Ranger’s animal companion, Paladin’s mount, or spellcaster’s familiar can automatically do anything on this list that it is physically capable of doing.
Combat Actions
Pets with combat training obey your commands as best they can. They take their turns on your initiative. A pet can be commanded to move without using an action, but all other commands require an action on your part. You may use your action to command your pet to Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge, or Help, if it has learned those combat actions. Each combat action learned counts towards the maximum actions a pet can learn. Pets without combat training will cower or hide until combat is over. If a player character is riding their pet, the pet cannot take the Attack action.

Example Pets & Abilities

This is a table of example pets. Many other animals could exist in your campaign that fit these requirements, such as small monkeys, dinosaurs, ostriches, and the like. You may also choose to make exceptions for more powerful animals such as elephants, griffons, hippogriffs, pegasi, or dragon wyrmlings.
Each animal is listed with their size and challenge rating. Animals that can be purchased have prices. Each animal has a list of suggested actions that animal can learn, based on the animal type. Not all trained animals know all the actions in their action lists when purchased. For example, a riding dog would probably know how to act as a mount, but might not know how to perform. Known actions can be determined by where the animal is purchased, or randomly generated. A GM can determine that a given animal can learn an action not listed. Animals that can’t be trained simply cannot learn instructions, by their very nature. They can still be successfully domesticated.

Can Be Purchased Trained
Animal Size CR Average Price Can be trained?
Hawk Tiny 0 25 den Hunt, Perform, Messenger Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Camel Large 1/8 50 den Mount, Harness, Perform, Intimidate, Light Source (must be tied to the animal somehow) Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Mastiff Medium 1/8 25 den Guard, Hunt, Perform, Search, Track, Light Source, Harness, Mount, Messenger, Hide, Intimidate, Light Source (can be carried in mouth or tied to the body) Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge, Help
Mule Medium 1/8 8 den Harness, Mount, Perform, Light Source (must be tied to the animal) Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Pony Medium 1/8 30 den Harness, Mount, Perform, Light Source (must be tied to the animal) Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Flying Snake Tiny 1/8 25 den Messenger, Perform, Hunt, Hide
Draft Horse Large 1/4 50 den Harness, Mount, Perform, Light Source (must be tied to the animal) Attack, Disengage, Dodge, Dash
Giant Lizard Large 1/4 75 den Harness, Mount, Hunt Attack, Disengage, Dodge, Dash
Riding Horse Large 1/4 75 den Harness, Mount, Perform Attack, Disengage, Dodge, Dash
Warhorse Large 1/2 400 den Harness Mount, Perform, Intimidate Attack (can attack while mounted), Disengage, Dodge, Dash
Can Be Purchased Domesticated (generally do not have training when purchased)
Animal Size CR Average Price Can be trained?
Giant Fire Beetle Small 0 1 den Light Source
Goat Medium 0 1 den Perform, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Rat Tiny 0 0 (Free!) Messenger, Guard, Hide, Perform, Search, Track
Weasel Tiny 0 1 sp Messenger, Hide, Perform
Raven Tiny 0 1 sp Messenger (can speak simple phrases of one language), Perform
Cat Tiny 1/8 1 sp Hide, Perform, Hunt, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Giant Rat Small 1/8 2 cp Messenger, Guard, Hide, Perform, Search, Track, Hunt, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Giant Weasel Medium 1/8 1 den Perform, Guard, Hunt, Mount Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Giant Frog Medium 1/4 1 den Perform, Guard, Harness, Intimidate
Never Found Domesticated
Animal CR Can be trained?
Badger 0 Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Bat 0 Messenger
Constrictor Snake 0 Intimidate
Deer 0 Hide, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Eagle 0 Hunt, Perform, Messenger, Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Hyena 0 Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Jackal 0 Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Octopus 0 Perform, Hide, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge (Owner must be able to issue commands underwater)
Owl 0 Hunt, Messenger, Hide, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Vulture 0 Hunt, Messenger, Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge, Poisonous Snake (1/8) Intimidate
Blood Hawk (1/8) Hunt, Messenger, Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Axe Beak (1/4) Harness, Mount, Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Giant Badger (1/4) Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Giant Bat (1/4) Mount, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Boar (1/4) Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Elk (1/4) Harness, Mount, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Giant Centipede (1/4) Intimidate
Giant Crab (1/4) Intimidate
Giant Poisonous Snake (1/4) Intimidate
Giant Wolf Spider (1/4) Mount, Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Panther (1/4) Hide, Hunt, Perform, Track, Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge
Wolf (1/4) Hunt, Perform, Track, Search, Messenger, Intimidate, Attack, Dash, Disengage, Dodge

Source. This material was originally created by EN World EN5IDER.

Locations Around Imrallon

Stay Tuned, Still in Progress

Pantheon on Imrallon

Imrallon uses a modified version of the Greek Pantheon. Below are the major ones. Histories and the others can be viewed here.

Greater Pantheon

The Greater Pantheon comprises of the First Twelve deities. Of the First Twelve, Zeus, Hera, Poseidon and Hades, were direct descendants of the Titans. The rest of them are their offspring. During the Titan Wars, the First Twelve were Generals and leaders that were led by Zeus. The Titan Wars lasted for centuries and was finished when the combined forces of Zeus, Poseidon and Hades slew their father, Cronos. The death of Cronos unleashed divine power that was absorbed by Zeus, who the others named as their King. With this power, Zeus declared the First Twelve and distributed the portfolios that were absorbed. They continued to rule their specific domains and created more deities. These are members of the Lesser Pantheon as they do not have the same power as the First Twelve.

Zeus
  • Alignment: Neutral (N)
  • Favored Weapon: Greatsword
  • Favored Animal: Eagle
  • Symbol:Lightning Bolt
  • Portfolio:God of the sky, weather, and lightning; King of the gods
  • Cleric Domains: Tempest
  • Brief Description: King of the gods and ruler of Mount Olympus; God of the Sky, Lightning and Thunder. Zeus appears as an older human man. He tends to wear simple white robes and almost always has his lightning bolt. Perched on his shoulder is his Eagle. His dragon form is that of a great golden dragon.
  • Typical Followers: A majority of the followers of Zeus are the humans of the lands. He is revered my soldiers of the legions as “The First General”, as well as leaders and military tacticians.
Hera
  • Alignment: Chaotic Good (CG)
  • Favored Weapon: Mace
  • Favored Animal: Peacock
  • Symbol: Spread out peacock feathers
  • Portfolio: Goddess of family, marriage, and children; Queen of the gods
  • Cleric Domains: Trickery
  • Brief Description: The Queen of the Gods appears as a middle aged human woman that is dressed in silk robes that are adorned with peacock feathers. She also has been known to appear as a peacock, mostly to spy on her husband Zeus. Her dragon form is that of a fierce gold dragon.
  • Typical Followers: Followers and clerics of Hera often preside over weddings and ceremonies. She presides over women and jilted lovers, of all races.
Poseidon
  • Alignment: Chaotic Neutral (CN)
  • Favored Weapon: Trident
  • Favored Animal: Dolphin, Horse
  • Symbol: Trident and Waves
  • Portfolio: God of the seas
  • Cleric Domains: Tempest, Nature
  • Brief Description: Poseidon appears in two animal forms, either that of a dolphin or a mighty horse, depending on if he is appearing on land or in the water. His actual form is that of an older male human wearing simple robes and carrying his trident. His dragon form is a great blue dragon.
  • Typical Followers: Followers include sailors, fishermen and those that live by the seas. Minotaurs, Centaur, Nereids, and Tritons all generally follow Poseidon.
Hades
  • Alignment: Lawful Evil (LE)
  • Favored Weapon: Helmet
  • Favored Animal: Cerebus, Snake
  • Symbol: Three-headed Cerebus
  • Portfolio: God of the Underworld, Death and Mortality
  • Cleric Domains: Death, Grave
  • Brief Description: Hades appears, generally, as a snake or his favored cerebus to his followers. His true form is that of an older human male with long white beard and a great staff. He is dressed in black robes that smell of death. His dragon form is an imposing Tarterian dragon with drooping flesh, tattered wings, deep black eyes with glowing green and black teeth and claw. His leathery scales were covered in patches of dark gray, olive-green, and black patterns.
  • Typical Followers: Followers of Hades are undertakers, dealers in dead, death cults and enemies of the Undead.
Hephaestus
  • Alignment: Lawful Neutral (LN)
  • Favored Weapon: Axe, Hammer
  • Favored Animal: Fire Elemental
  • Symbol: Hammer and Anvil
  • Portfolio: God of masonry, blacksmithing, and fire and the forge
  • Cleric Domains: Forge, Knowledge
  • Brief Description: Hephaestus appears to his followers in his true form as a sturdy dwarf with a lame leg. He wears his blacksmith’s gear and carries a great warhammer. His dragon form is that of a pyroclastic dragon with a body that was heavily muscled and solidly built. His lame leg carried over in this form and his right rear leg is visibly lame. His scales looked like broken obsidian, ash and hot magma.
  • Typical Followers: Having created the dwarves, most of his followers are dwarvenkind. Blacksmiths and craftsmen are also known to follow the Forgemaster.
Hermes
  • Alignment: Chaotic Good (CG)
  • Favored Weapon: Staff
  • Favored Animal: Ram
  • Symbol: Winged Boots
  • Portfolio: God of Travel, Mischief, Thieves, Commerce, and Language; Messenger of the Gods
  • Cleric Domains: Trickery
  • Brief Description: Hermes appears as either a fox or as a male, young adult human of short stature. He wears a tortoise shell shield, a Caduceus and his signature winged boots. His dragon form is that of a great fairy dragon.
  • Typical Followers: Hermes has a devout following of the Vupine, of which he created with Aphrodite, but also merchants, traders, thieves and spies.
Aphrodite
  • Alignment: Chaotic Good (CG)
  • Favored Weapon: Girdle
  • Favored Animal:Dove
  • Symbol: Dove and Rose
  • Portfolio: Goddess of Beauty, Desire, Lust, and Love
  • Cleric Domains: Light
  • Brief Description: Aphrodite appears as a beautiful woman to all who look upon her. The definition of “beautiful” in her appearance is in the eye of her viewers. She rarely appears clothed and is almost always nude. Her dragon form is that of a sleek copper sea dragon.
  • Typical Followers: Most of Aphrodite’s followers come from the world’s brothels, but also vain aristocrats.
Apollo
  • Alignment: Neutral Good (NG)
  • Favored Weapon: Longbow
  • Favored Animal: Wolf, Raven, Lizard
  • Symbol: Sun bathed lyre
  • Portfolio: God of the sun, archery, athleticism, prophecy, the arts, and good health
  • Cleric Domains: Knowledge, Life, Light
  • Brief Description: Apollo rarely appeared as an animal, but when he did, it was generally a raven. His true form is that of a a young male human with a stature that appeared to be chiseled from the purest marble. He wore luxurious white robes and always had his lyre and longbow on him. His dragon form is that of a great silver dragon with a blue shade to his scales, a near exact twin of his sister Artemis.
  • Typical Followers: Apollo has a tremendous following among the elves and woodland creatures. He also has a strange following with gladiators, athletes, oracles and seers.
Ares
  • Alignment: Chaotic Evil (CE)
  • Favored Weapon: Longspear
  • Favored Animal: Dog, Vulture
  • Symbol: Clawed spear and shield
  • Portfolio: God of war, combat, and weapons
  • Cleric Domains: War, Death
  • Brief Description: Ares only appears before his beloved orcs and, when he does, he is a young, muscular orc male that is battle-scarred and carries his longspear that continually drips the blood of his enemies. His dragon form is that of a great red dragon with deep, blood red scales.
  • Typical Followers: Ares created the orcs and every orc owes its allegiance to the God of War. Other followers include warmongers, gladiators and berserkers.
Artemis
  • Alignment: Chaotic Good (CG)
  • Favored Weapon: Bow, Pike
  • Favored Animal: Boar, Bear, Deer
  • Symbol: Moon bathed bow and arrow
  • Portfolio: Goddess of the moon, archery, hunting, childbirth, and virginity
  • Cleric Domains: Nature, Life
  • Brief Description: Artemis appears to her followers as a stag and rarely, if ever, as her true form. Her true form is that of a beautiful young human woman that is wearing leather armor and carrying her longbow. She has brown hair that is kept short and hazel colored eyes. Her dragon form is that of a great silver dragon with a blue shade to her scales, a near exact twin of her brother . Apollo.
  • Typical Followers: Much like her twin brother Apollo, Artemis has a large and devout following from among the elves.
Athena
  • Alignment: Lawful Good (LG)
  • Favored Weapon: Spear
  • Favored Animal: Owl
  • Symbol: Owl perched on an olive branch
  • Portfolio: Goddess of Wisdom, Reason, Handiwork, and Strategy in battle
  • Cleric Domains: Knowledge, War
  • Brief Description: Athena appears as a young woman that is wearing a shining suit of silver full plate armor and carries her great glaive. Her dragon form is that of a great silver dragon.
  • Typical Followers: Athena has a following of monks, including her 10,000 fists, strategists, teachers and loremasters.
Demeter
  • Alignment: Neutral Good (NG)
  • Favored Weapon: Scythe or Sickle
  • Favored Animal: Pig
  • Symbol: Cornucopia
  • Portfolio: Goddess of Agriculture and Soil
  • Cleric Domains: Life
  • Brief Description: Demeter would occasionally appear to her followers as a gentle pig or in her true form, which is that of a modest middle-aged woman that is dressed in simple farm clothes and has her sickle hanging at her side. She does have a dragon form, which is that of a wingless brown dragon with dirt colored, leathery scales. Demeter could easily fly in her dragon form, but she preferred to be close to the ground.
  • Typical Followers: Farmers are a majority of Demeter’s following, along with a great number of druids, dryads and centaurs
Lesser Pantheon

The Lesser Pantheon are descendants of the First Twelve, but also consist of those that have earned the God’s favor and blessings. These individuals were blessed with divinity and given a portfolio.

Asclepius
  • Alignment: Neutral (N)
  • Favored Weapon: Staff
  • Favored Animal: Snake
  • Symbol: Staff with Entwined Snakes
  • Portfolio: God of Healing and Medicine
  • Domains: Life
  • Description: Asclepius appears to followers as a wise and old human man that is dressed in simple off-white robes and carries his Staff of Asclepius. He travels from town to town to assist healers with medical procedures as a way to increase his followers. Unlike the other deities, Asclepius does not have nor care for having a dragon form. Furthermore, he has pronounced himself as neutral for any conflicts and the sacred Vow of Peace. He will not partake in fighting, but will help with treating the injured on both sides.
  • Followers: Followers of Asclepius are healers, medicine men and witch doctors
Dionysus
  • Alignment: Chaotic Neutral (CN)
  • Favored Weapon: Staff
  • Favored Animal: Panther
  • Symbol: Thyrsus (staff topped with grapevine wrapped pine cone
  • Portfolio: God of the Wine, Parties and Religious Ecstasy
  • Domains: Life
  • Description: Dionysus appeared to his followers generally as that of a sleek black panther. His true form is that of a slender, drunken elf that wears fine silken robes and always has a carafe that never runs out of wine. Unlike the other gods, Dioysus does not have a dragon form.
  • Followers: Partygoers, Winemakers and Entertainers
Hecate
  • Alignment: Chaotic Evil (CE)
  • Favored Weapon: Rapier
  • Favored Animal: Snake or Dog
  • Symbol: Paired Torches Over A Setting Moon
  • Portfolio: Goddess of Witchcraft, Undeath and Evil
  • Domains: Life
  • Description: Mistress of the Undead. A beautiful and powerful goddess in her own right, Hecate generally appears as a beautiful, middle-aged elf with long brown hair and matching brown eyes, but can also appear as an old hag with a smelly, ragged appearance. Her dragon form is that of a great undead dragon, a dracolich.
  • Followers: Necromancers, Undead, Death Cultists
Hestia
  • Alignment: Neutral Good (NG)
  • Favored Weapon: Dagger
  • Favored Animal: Donkey
  • Symbol: Hearth and Flame
  • Portfolio: Goddess of Home and Family
  • Domains: Life
  • Description: Generally, Hestia appeared to her followers in her chosen form of a donkey. However, in her actual form, she is a young modest human woman that is dressed in modest clothing. She is always carrying a flame that is from the homes of the soldiers. Her dragon form is that of a pseudodragon with flame orange/red scales.
  • Followers: Wives and families of soldiers, Vestal Virgins
Janus
  • Alignment: Neutral Good (NG)
  • Favored Weapon: Light Hammer
  • Favored Animal: Snake
  • Symbol: Two Faces
  • Portfolio: God of Doorways, Beginnings and Ends, and Decisions
  • Domains: Knowledge
  • Description: Janus has no actual physical appearance, but has appeared as a marble head with two faces and would speak alternatively from each mouth.
  • Followers: Midwives, Undertakers and Leaders
Pan
  • Alignment: CN
  • Favored Weapon: Pan Flute
  • Favored Animal: Goat
  • Symbol: Pan Flute
  • Portfolio: God of Nature and Wild Beasts
  • Domains: Nature, Trickery
  • Description: Pan appears to his followers in his true form, which is that of a satyr and always has a group of nymph companions with him. He wears a dark green tunic, no pants and always has is flute with him. His dragon form is that a great copper dragon.
  • Followers: Druids, Rangers, farmers and nature lovers worship Pan. He also has a huge following of nymphs, satyrs and dryads.
Prometheus
  • Alignment: N
  • Favored Weapon: Spell
  • Favored Animal: Rabbit
  • Symbol: A rune covered Crystal Staff
  • Portfolio: God of Magic
  • Domains: Knowledge
  • Description: Prometheus appears as a middle-aged wizard with a long white, shaggy beard that wears great, flowing, arcane runed robes. Being both a Titan and the God of Magic, Prometheus has a dragon form that has eight dragon heads. Each dragon head is for a school of magic.
  • FollowersFollowers of Prometheus would mostly be mages and those who practice Magic. However, he also has followers that are sages, storytellers and those in the pursuit of knowledge.
Tyche
  • Alignment: Neutral (CN)
  • Favored Weapon: Mace
  • Favored Animal: Rabbit
  • Symbol: Red Pentagram
  • Portfolio: Goddess of Luck and Good Fortune
  • Domains: Trickery
  • Description: Generally, Tyche appeared to her followers in her chosen form of a rabbit. However, in her actual form, she is a young beautiful elven woman that is dressed in fine silk robes. She wears a thin, loose silver chain pendant with a silvered yellow coin. Her dragon form is that of a rare Yellow Dragon with dark, almost brown, yellow scales and no wings.
  • Followers: Merchants, Soldiers, Pirates and those seeking better odds.